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Shoulder Surgery

Shoulder Surgery

The shoulders are among the most important joints in the human body. Unfortunately, as we age our shoulders can wear out plus they may be subject to debilitating conditions such as arthritis, disease, or other injuries.

Your shoulder is the most flexible joint in your body. It allows you to place and rotate your arm in many positions in front, above, to the side, and behind your body. This flexibility also makes your shoulder susceptible to instability and injury.

Depending on the nature of the problem, nonsurgical methods of treatment often are recommended before surgery. However, in some instances, delaying the surgical repair of a shoulder can increase the likelihood that the problem will be more difficult to treat later. Early, correct diagnosis and treatment of shoulder problems can make a significant difference in the long run.

How the Normal Shoulder Works

(Anatomy of the shoulder joint)

The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint. It is made up of three bones: the upper arm bone (humerus), shoulder blade (scapula) and collarbone (clavicle).

The ball at the top end of the arm bone fits into the small socket (glenoid) of the shoulder blade to form the shoulder joint (glenohumeral joint).

The socket of the glenoid is surrounded by a soft-tissue rim (labrum).

A smooth, durable surface (articular cartilage) on the head of the arm bone, and a thin inner lining (synovium) of the joint allows the smooth motion of the shoulder joint.

The upper part of the shoulder blade (acromion) projects over the shoulder joint. One end of the collarbone is joined with the shoulder blade by the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. The other end of the collarbone is joined with the breastbone (sternum) by the sternoclavicular joint.

The joint capsule is a thin sheet of fibers that surrounds the shoulder joint. The capsule allows a wide range of motion, yet provides stability.

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that attach your upper arm to your shoulder blade. The rotator cuff covers the shoulder joint and joint capsule.

The muscles attached to the rotator cuff enable you to lift your arm, reach overhead, and take part in activities such as throwing or swimming.

A sac-like membrane (bursa) between the rotator cuff and the shoulder blade cushions and helps lubricate the motion between these two structures.

 

Shoulder Problems and Treatments

Bursitis or Tendinitis

Bursitis or tendinitis can occur with overuse from repetitive activities, such as swimming, painting, or weight lifting. These activities cause rubbing or squeezing (impingement) of the rotator cuff under the acromion and in the acromioclavicular joint. Initially, these problems are treated by modifying the activity which causes the symptoms of pain and with a rehabilitation program for the shoulder.

Impingement and Partial Rotator Cuff Tears

Partial thickness rotator cuff tears can be associated with chronic inflammation and the development of spurs on the underside of the acromion or the acromioclavicular joint.

The conservative nonsurgical treatment is modification of activity, light exercise, and, occasionally, a cortisone injection. Nonsurgical treatment is successful in a majority of cases. If it is not successful, surgery often is needed to remove the spurs on the underside of the acromion and to repair the rotator cuff.

 

Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

Full-thickness rotator cuff tears are most often the result of impingement, partial thickness rotator cuff tears, heavy lifting, or falls. Nonsurgical treatment with modification of activity is successful in a majority of cases.

If pain continues, surgery may be needed to repair full- thickness rotator cuff tears. Arthroscopic techniques allow shaving of spurs, evaluation of the rotator cuff, and repair of some tears.

Both techniques require extensive rehabilitation to restore the function of the shoulder.

 

Instability of the Shoulder

Instability occurs when the head of the upper arm bone is forced out of the shoulder socket. This can happen as a result of sudden injury or from overuse of the shoulder ligaments.

The two basic forms of shoulder instability are subluxations and dislocations. A subluxation is a partial or incomplete dislocation. If the shoulder is partially out of the shoulder socket, it eventually may dislocate. Even a minor injury may push the arm bone out of its socket. A dislocation is when the head of the arm bone slips out of the shoulder socket. Some patients have chronic instability. Shoulder dislocations may occur repeatedly.

Patients with repeat dislocation usually require surgery. Open surgical repair may require a short stay in the hospital. Arthroscopic surgical repair is often done on an outpatient basis. Following either procedure, extensive rehabilitation, often including physical therapy, is necessary for healing.

 

Fractured Collarbone and Acromioclavicular Joint Separation

A fractured collarbone and acromioclavicular separation are common injuries of children and others who fall on the side of their shoulder when playing. Most of these injuries are treated nonsurgically with slings or splints. Severe displaced fractures or acromioclavicular joint separation may require surgical repair.

 

 

 

Fractured Head of the Humerus (Arm Bone), or Proximal Humerus Fracture

A fractured head of the humerus is a common result of falls on an outstretched arm, particularly by older people with osteoporosis. If fragmented or displaced, it may require open surgical repair and possibly replacement with an artificial joint (prosthesis).

 

 

 

 

Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis can destroy the shoulder joint and surrounding tissue. They can also cause degeneration and tearing of the capsule or the rotator cuff. Osteoarthritis occurs when the articular surface of the joint wears thin. Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with chronic inflammation of the synovium lining which can produce chemicals that eventually destroy the inner lining of the joint, including the articular surface.

 

 

 

Shoulder replacement

Shoulder replacement is recommended for patients with painful shoulders and limited motion. The treatment options are either replacement of the head of the bone or replacement of the entire socket. Your orthopaedic surgeon will discuss with you the best option.

 

 

Orthopaedic Evaluation

The orthopaedic evaluation of your shoulder consists of three components:

  • A medical history to gather information about current complaints; duration of symptoms, pain and limitations; injuries; and past treatment with medications or surgery.
  • A physical examination to assess swelling, tenderness, range of motion, strength or weakness, instability, and/or deformity of the shoulder.
  • Diagnostic tests, such as X-rays taken with the shoulder in various positions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be helpful in assessing soft tissues in the shoulder. Computed tomography (CT) scan may be used to evaluate the bony parts of the shoulder.

Your orthopaedic surgeon will review the results of your evaluation with you and discuss the best treatment. You and your doctor may agree that surgery is the best treatment option. He or she will explain the potential risks and complications that may occur. Your doctor may discuss donating your own blood to be used if needed during surgery.

Some surgical procedures require hospitalization for a number of days. Your doctor may discuss planning for the period after surgery. You may need to either stay in an extended care facility or have someone help you when you return home.

Preparing for Surgery

  • No food or drink after midnight before surgery.
  • Discuss with your doctor what to do about medications taken in the morning.
  • An hour before surgery, you will be assessed in the preoperative area by a nurse anesthetist or anesthesiologist.

Types of Surgical Procedures

You may be given the option to have an arthroscopic procedure or an open surgical procedure.

Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy allows the orthopaedic surgeon to insert a pencil-thin device with a small lens and lighting system into tiny incisions to look inside the joint. The images inside the joint are relayed to a TV monitor, allowing the doctor to make a diagnosis. Other surgical instruments can be inserted to make repairs, based on what is with the arthroscope. Arthroscopy often can be done on an outpatient basis. According to the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, more than 1.4 million shoulder arthroscopies are performed worldwide each year.

Open Surgery

Open surgery may be necessary and, in some cases, may be associated with better results than arthroscopy. Open surgery often can be done through small incisions of just a few inches.

Recovery and rehabilitation is related to the type of surgery performed inside the shoulder, rather than whether there was an arthroscopic or open surgical procedure.

Possible Complications After Surgery

There are always some risks with any surgery, even arthroscopic procedures. These include possible infection, and damage to surrounding nerves and blood vessels. However, modern surgical techniques and close monitoring have significantly minimized the occurrence of these problems.

After surgery, some pain, tenderness, and stiffness are normal. You should be alert for certain signs and symptoms that may suggest the development of complications.

  • Fever after the second day following surgery
  • Increasing pain or swelling
  • Redness, warmth, or tenderness which may suggest a wound infection
  • Unusual bleeding (some surgical wound drainage is normal and, in fact, desirable
  • Numbness or tingling of the arm or hand

Prevention of Future Problems

It is important that you continue a shoulder exercise program with daily stretching and strengthening. In general, patients who faithfully comply with the therapies and exercises prescribed by their orthopaedic surgeon and physical therapist will have the best medical outcome after surgery.

Your orthopaedic surgeon is a medical doctor with extensive training in the diagnosis and nonsurgical and surgical treatment of the musculoskeletal system, including bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, and nerves.

Using your shoulder after surgery

You had surgery on your shoulder to repair a muscle, tendon, or cartilage tear. The surgeon may have removed damaged tissue. You will need to know how to take care of your shoulder as it heals, and how to make it stronger.

What to Expect at Home

You will need to wear a sling when you leave the hospital. You may also need to wear a shoulder immobilizer. This keeps your shoulder from moving. How long you need to wear the sling or immobilizer depends on the type of surgery you had.

Follow your surgeon’s instructions for how to take care of your shoulder at home. Use the information below as a reminder.

Self-care

Wear the sling or immobilizer at all times, unless the surgeon says you do not have to.

  • It is ok to straighten your arm below your elbow and move your wrist and hand. But try to move your arm as little as possible.
  • Your arm should bend at a 90° angle (a right angle) at your elbow. The sling should support your wrist and hand so that they do not extend past the sling.
  • Move your fingers, hand, and wrist around 3 to 4 times during the day while they are in the sling. Each time, do this 10 to 15 times.
  • When the surgeon tells you to, begin taking your arm out of the sling and let it hang loosely by your side. Do this for longer periods each day.

If you wear a shoulder immobilizer, you can loosen it only at the wrist strap and straighten your arm at your elbow. Be careful not to move your shoulder when you do this. DO NOT take off the immobilizer all the way unless the surgeon tells you it is OK.

If you had rotator cuff surgery or other ligament or labral surgery, you need to be careful with your shoulder. Ask the surgeon what arm movements are safe to do.

  • DO NOT move your arm away from your body or over your head.
  • When you sleep, raise your upper body up on pillows. DO NOT lie flat. You can also try sleeping on a reclining chair.

You may also be told not to use your or hand on the side that had surgery. For example, DO NOT:

  • Lift anything with this arm or hand.
  • Lean on the arm or put any weight on it.
  • Bring objects toward your stomach by pulling in with this arm and hand.
  • Move or twist your elbow behind your body to reach for anything.

Your surgeon will refer you to a physical therapist to learn exercises for your shoulder. To learn more about TOCA’s Physical Therapy Team Click HERE

  • You will probably start with passive exercises. These are exercises the therapist will do with your arm. They help get the full movement back in your shoulder.
  • After that you will do exercises the therapist teaches you. These will help increase the strength in your shoulder and the muscles around your shoulder.

Consider making some changes around your home so it is easier for you to take care of yourself. Store everyday items you use in places you can reach easily. Keep things with you that you use a lot (such as your phone).

When to Call the Doctor

Call your surgeon or nurse if you have any of the following:

  • Bleeding that soaks through your dressing and does not stop when you place pressure over the area
  • Pain that does not go away when you take your pain medicine
  • Swelling in your arm
  • Your hand or fingers are darker in color or feel cool to the touch
  • Numbness or tingling in your fingers or hand
  • Redness, pain, swelling, or a yellowish discharge from any of the wounds
  • Fever of 101°F (38.3°C), or higher
  • Shortness of breath and chest pain

 

For questions about your shoulder pain or to schedule an appointment call the dedicated TOCA Team at: 602-451-4051!

For more articles and information about your shoulder consider reading more on our shoulder page and/or additional articles such as: Shoulder Pain: When to Worry and Shoulder Injury Prevention Tips

#Recovery #Results #Relief #MyOrthoDoc #TOCA #TOCAMD #shoulderpain #painfree #shouldersurgery

 

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org

Dr. Cummings and Vito Berlingeri talk Golf, injuries and recovery in the latest addition of the AZ Golf Insider!

Dr. Cummings and Vito Berlingeri talk Golf, injuries and recovery in the latest addition of the AZ Golf Insider. Check out the full artical by clicking here: http://staging.yudu.com/…/…/45vcVtT1Y15VmxzM/html/index.html

“When I went into his office, Dr. Cummings greeted me like he had known me for 30 years”, said Berlingeri. “He told me with surgery and physical rehab, I would be back to hitting golf balls within seven weeks.”

That’s exactly what happened, with Berlingeri able to play 18 holes just three months after surgery.

Associated with TOCA since 2001, Dr. Cummings estimates that up to 40% of the patients he sees play golf, including numerous PGA Tour professionals. No matter the skill level, he encourages all golfers to take injury prevention measures, especially keeping your core strong.

“Your body only has so much time before wear and tear happens. I’ve recommended other golfer friends with injuries go to Dr. Cummings at TOCA ever since.” (said Vito Berlingeri)

Getting an accurate diagnosis and then a plan is critical to the process, Berlingeri and his physician (Dr. Dean Cummings) agreed.

“You have to spend at least 10-15 minutes warming up in what I call a combination dynamic and static workout. That’s doing some stretches plus some movement patterns. I also recommend stretching while you’re playing.”

“At TOCA we provide an excellent assessment while looking at the whole body and not just an individual body part,” Dr. Cummings said. “We also make sure that each patient is treated with conservative therapeutic management first, and then surgery if needed. I think we have doctors in our group who are phenomenally gifted, but the good thing is they know when to operate, which is very important.”

Dr. P. Dean Cummings is an Orthopedic Surgeon & Sports Medicine Physician and Surgeon at TOCA.

To learn more about Dr. Cummings and TOCA or to schedule an appointment visit: www.tocamd.com or call 602-277-6211!

#Results #Recovery #Relife #Golf #AZGolf #AZGolfInsider #AGA#BunkertoBunker #TOCA #TOCAMD 

Shoulder Pain: When to Worry

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Shoulder Pain: When to Worry! The shoulder is the most mobile joint in the body and because of its extensive range of motion it’s susceptible to injury and pain. While the shoulder is not thought of as a weight bearing joint, once you lift an object or roll over at night, the forces going through the shoulder joint exceed those of most joints due to the long lever arm of the outstretched arm. The shoulder can hurt after it has been injured or for no apparent reason. Most shoulder problems are relatively short-lived but sometimes the pain is indicative of a more complex issue.

No worries:

Slight pain with elevation and when playing overhead sports is common. The four tendons that make up the rotator cuff and the biceps tendon, (the combined musculature that drives the shoulder motions) can be inflamed by activities such as throwing, shooting basketballs, and lifting bags over head. The tendons are covered by a thin layer called a bursa, which swells when irritated. The bursitis is filled with inflammatory components that irritate the nerve fibers sending pain signals to the brain. Eliminating the overhead activities and mild use of anti-inflammatories usually cures the mild bursitis, or tendonitis, and solves the problem. Exercises to strengthen posture are also commonly used by our physical therapists to fix mild shoulder irritations. Slumping at your desk, reaching for your mouse, hunching over your keyboard, can all put extra strain on the shoulder, neck or back and may be the cause of your shoulder pain. Stand with your shoulders at or behind your hips with your belly button tucked in and notice the difference.

More worry:

Pain that does not go away or pain that occurs with every activity indicates that the key tissues are irritated enough that they are sending pain signals even without motion. This degree of inflammation precedes more structural injuries such as tears of the tissue or early arthritis. Treated fully, the tears and the arthritis can be prevented.

Real worry:

Pain at night or pain not improving with therapy after 4 weeks are red flags. Pain radiating down the arm or up to the neck or to the back are also worrisome for injuries not just in the shoulder but sometimes of the neck. These injuries need to be worked up with careful physical exams, x-rays and MRIs. A full tear of the rotator cuff often will present with night pain, since when you roll over you push the arm up into the socket through the rotator cuff tear. Pain radiating down the arm or up to the neck can sometimes be from the discs in the neck or the nerves at the front of the shoulder called the brachial plexus. Instability of the shoulder, with the shoulder popping in or out of the joint is another area that is best treated with early repair of the torn ligaments.

Fortunately most of the torn tissue problems in the shoulder can be repaired under a local block with an arthroscope as an outpatient procedure. The key is to treat them early before full tearing of tissues leads to disability.

Are you experiencing shoulder pain?

To speak to a Shoulder Specialist at TOCA call: 602-277-6211 or visit our shoulder specialty page to learn more.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]