Congratulations to Dr. Evan Lederman for his recent publication!

Title: The Evolution of the Superior Capsular Reconstruction Technique

Alan M. Hirahara, MD, FRCSC; Evan S. Lederman, MD; Wyatt J. Andersen, ATC; and Kyle Yamashiro, PT, DPT, CSCS

Introduction

Irreparable, massive rotator cuff tears can result in unacceptable functional deficits in patients. When the supraspinatus tears and retracts medially, the superior capsule is also disrupted, and superior constraint is lost. With no superior restraint to the humerus, the humeral head migrates superiorly, causing a decrease in the acromial-humeral distance. [1-4]

Biomechanical analysis has shown that a defect in the superior capsule results in a minimum 200% greater glenohumeral superior translation and subacromial peak contact pressure compared with an intact capsule. [3] The malposition of the humeral head leads to functional abnormalities and pseudoparalysis.

Numerous proposed treatments for massive rotator cuff tears – including debridement and tenotomy, tendon transfers, and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty – have yielded mixed results and high complication rates. [5-12] In particular, reverse shoulder arthroplasty can result in humeral or glenoid fractures, persistent anterior or posterior instabilities, loosening of the glenoid or humeral cemented components, dislocations, and infection. [5-7]

The superior capsular reconstruction (SCR) was described by Hanada et al [13] in 1993 and by Mihata et al [1] in 2013 as an alternative procedure to increase function and decrease pain by restoring the restraint mechanisms in the shoulder. Using a graft to recreate the superior capsule, the humeral head is centered in the glenoid, allowing the larger muscles (ie, deltoid, latissimus dorsi, and pectoralis major) to function appropriately. Mihata et al [3,4] have found that the SCR reduces glenohumeral superior translation and subacromial contact force.

Full article link below.

ICJR.net  March 2018