Dr. Evan Lederman and colleagues review how bone reacts to shoulder replacements and propose a classification system for critical review of implant/bone interaction

Title: Stress shielding of the humerus in press-fit anatomic shoulder arthroplasty: review and recommendations for evaluation

Patrick Denard MD, Patric Raiss MD, Reuben Gobezie MD, T. Bradley Edwards MD, Evan S. Lederman MD

Introduction

Uncemented press-fit humeral stems were developed with the goal of decreasing operative time, preserving bone stock, and easing revision. In recent years, short stems and stemless humeral implants have also become available. These press-fit humeral implants have varying designs that can lead to changes in stress distribution in the proximal humerus. Such stress shielding manifests as bony adaptations and may affect long-term functional outcome and the ability to perform revision. However, current studies of humeral fixation during total shoulder arthroplasty are complicated because a variety of classification systems have been used to report findings.

Full article link below.

Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery E-pub February 6, 2018

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2017.12.020

Dr. Lederman and colleagues discuss the outcome of a subscapularis peel repair with a stem-based repair after total shoulder arthroplasty

Title: Healing and functional outcome of a subscapularis peel repair with a stem-based repair after total shoulder arthroplasty

Reuben Gobezie MD, Patrick Denard MD, Yousef Shishani MD, Anthony Romeo MD, Evan S. Lederman MD

Background

The purpose of this study was to evaluate functional outcome and healing of a subscapularis peel with a stem-based repair after total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). The hypothesis was that the repair would lead to subscapularis healing in the majority of cases.

Full article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2017.02.013

Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Volume 26, Issue 9, September 2017, Pages 1603-1608

Dr Lederman, Dr Harmsen and colleagues review strategies to prevent infection in shoulder replacement. *

Title: Preventing infection in shoulder arthroplasty: Navigating the minefields

Abstract

Periprosthetic infection after shoulder arthroplasty represents a devastating complication that often requires extensive revision surgery with substantial economic and patient burden, and ultimately leads to reduced patient function.

Seminars in Arthroplasty

Volume 28, Issue 3, September 2017, Pages 145-149

https://doi.org/10.1053/j.sart.2017.12.006

*This is based on a lecture by Dr Lederman at the 2017 Current Concepts in Shoulder Arthroplasty conference in Las Vegas, NV.

Dr. Lederman, Dr. Lund and former fellows have described a new class of labral tears in the shoulder*

Title: The Glenoid Labral Articular Teardrop Lesion: A Chondrolabral Injury With Distinct Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

Evan S. Lederman MD, Stephen Flores MD, Christopher Stevens MD, Damien Richardson MD, Pamela Lund MD

*Identification of this lesion of MRI can help in diagnosis and treatment of labral tears.

Purpose

Evaluation and description of a pathognomonic lesion identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a chondrolabral injury of the glenohumeral joint.

Methods

Patients were prospectively identified at the time of MRI by a characteristic teardrop appearance of a pedicled displaced chondrolabral flap in the axillary recess on coronal imaging and retrospectively reviewed.

Full article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2017.08.236

Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery

Volume 34, Issue 2, February 2018, Pages 407-411

 

Dr. Lederman and colleagues discuss the outcome and safety of a short stem shoulder replacement

Title: Short-term clinical outcome of an anatomic short-stem humeral component in total shoulder arthroplasty

Anthony A. Romeo MD, Robert J Thorness MD, Shelby A Sumner MPH, Reuben Gobezie MD, Evan S Lederman MD, Patrick J Denard MD

Background

Short-stem press-fit humeral components have recently been developed in an effort to preserve bone in total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), but few studies have reported outcomes of these devices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term clinical outcomes of an anatomic short-stem humeral component in TSA. We hypothesized that the implant would lead to significant functional improvement with low rates of radiographic loosening.

Full Article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2017.05.026

The Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Volume 27, Issue 1, January 2018, Pages 70-74

Dr. Lederman and Dr. Harmsen compare different techniques for shoulder replacement*

Title: Glenohumeral osteoarthritis in young patients: Stemless total shoulder arthroplasty trumps resurfacing arthroplasty—Opposes

Samuel Harmsen MD and Evan S Lederman MD

Abstract

When considering shoulder arthroplasty in a younger patient the surgeon can choose between stemmed, stemless or resurfacing implants for humeral reconstruction. Resurfacing arthroplasty can reproduce humeral anatomy independent of the humeral shaft, minimize bone resection and offer potential easier revision surgery. The resurfacing implant has been in use for over 30 years and has favorable long-term outcome.

Seminars in Arthroplasty

Volume 28, Issue 3, September 2017, Pages 121-123
*This is based on a lecture/Debate by Dr. Lederman with Dr. Sumant Krishnan at the 2017 Current Concepts in Shoulder Arthroplasty Conference in Las Vegas, NV.

Dr. Lederman and Dr. Harmsen discuss the challenges and techniques for revision shoulder replacement.*

Title: Humeral cemented revision: Techniques for safe extraction

Samuel Harmsen MD, Evan S. Lederman MD

Abstract

Removing a well-fixed humeral component in revision shoulder arthroplasty can present a difficult challenge. Intraoperative complications including iatrogenic fracture, humeral perforation, segmental bone loss, nerve and soft tissue injury can occur. These complications can occur with both cemented and press-fitted stems and can lead to increased morbidity and decreased functional outcomes. Complete removal of the cement mantle and cement restrictor, when necessary, can present even further challenges. Several extraction techniques have been described that can help minimize complications and enable safe, complete component extraction.

Seminars in Arthroplasty

Volume 28, Issue 3, September 2017, Pages 175-179
*This is based on a lecture by Dr. Lederman at the 2017 Current Concepts in Shoulder Arthroplasty Conference in Las Vegas, NV.

Dr. Lederman and colleagues review how bone reacts to shoulder replacements and document the potential benefit and safety of short stem shoulder implants

Title: Radiographic changes differ between two different short press-fit humeral stem designs in total shoulder arthroplasty

Patrick J. Denard MD, Matthew P Noyes MD, J B Walker MD, Youself Shishani MD, Reuben Gobezie MD, Anthony A Romeo MD, Evan S. Lederman MD

Background

The purpose of this study was to compare the radiographic changes of the humerus in the short term after total shoulder arthroplasty with two different short-stem humeral components. The hypothesis was that there would be no difference in radiographic changes or functional outcome based on component type.

Full article available: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2017.08.010

The Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Volume 27, Issue 2, February 2018, Pages 217-223

 

Dr. Lederman and colleagues review how bone can react differently to shoulder replacements and document the potential benefit and safety of short stem shoulder implants

Title: Proximal Stress is Decreased with a Short Stem Compared to a Traditional Length Stem In Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

Patrick J. Denard MD, Matthew P Noyes MD, J B Walker, MD, Yousef Shishani, MD, Reuben Gobezie MD, Anthony A Romeo, MD, Evan S. Lederman, MD

Background

This study compared the outcome and radiographic humeral adaptations after placement of a traditional-length (TL) or short-stem (SS) humeral component during total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). The hypothesis was there would be no difference in outcome or radiographic adaptations.

Full article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2017.06.042

The Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Volume 27, Issue 1, January 2018, Pages 53-58

Dr Lederman, Dr Hosack and colleagues from the University of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix discuss the potential for Vancomycin Powder to prevent infection in shoulder replacement.

Title: In vitro susceptibility of Propionibacterium acnes to simulated intrawound vancomycin concentrations

Luke Hosack MD MS, Derek Overstreet PhD, Evan S Lederman, MD

Background

There is convincing evidence supporting the prophylactic use of intrawound vancomycin powder in spinal fusion surgery and mounting evidence in the arthroplasty literature suggesting that it can reduce surgical site infections. As a result, a number of shoulder arthroplasty surgeons have adopted this practice, despite a paucity of evidence and the presence of a pathogen that is, for the most part, unique to this area of the body—Propionibacterium acnes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of vancomycin against planktonic P. acnes in vitro, using time-dependent concentrations one would expect in vivo after intra-articular application.

Full article available: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jses.2017.08.001

The Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Volume 1, Issue 3, October 2017, Pages 125-128
open access