Dr. Justin Roberts joining TOCA September 3, 2018

Dr. Roberts, MD is excited to be joining the outstanding physicians at The Orthopedic Clinic Association.

Dr. Justin Roberts is an orthopaedic surgeon who is fellowship trained in surgery of the foot and ankle. He specializes in comprehensive care of both simple and complex foot and ankle conditions including sports injuries, fractures, arthritis, and deformity. He has special interests in ankle replacement, flat foot correction, bunion correction, arthroscopy, traumatic and post-traumatic reconstruction.

Dr. Roberts was born and raised in Bakersfield, California. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of California, Santa Barbara, then attended medical school at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Roberts came to Phoenix for orthopaedic residency at Banner University Medical Center, then completed fellowship training at the Orthopaedics Associates of Michigan in Grand Rapids, MI. During fellowship, he received comprehensive training in complex surgical reconstruction of the foot and ankle.

Dr. Roberts promotes a relaxed atmosphere where open and honest communication is encouraged. Patient education is a critical part of his practice, and he will take the time to explain your condition and all treatment options. He emphasizes exhausting non-operative measures prior to recommending surgical intervention. Dr. Roberts understands that foot and ankle problems can be very disabling and recovery can be extensive. He is dedicated to working with you through every step to get you back to the quality of life you desire.

When not working, Dr. Roberts enjoys rugby, fishing, golf and spending time with his family.

 

Join Team TOCA with Dr. Feng & the Arthritis Foundation for the Walk to Cure Arthritis!

Enjoy the beautiful Arizona weather by joining Team TOCA, Dr. Earl Feng (Orthopedic Surgeon, Arthritis & Total Joint Reconstruction) and the Arthritis Foundation in the Annual Walk for the Cure, Saturday May 5th, 2018 at the Phoenix Zoo! Dr. Feng is not only a TOCA Physician & Surgeon but also serves as a Board Member for the Arthritis Foundation!

At TOCA, each of us has an important role in helping the more than 1.2 million Arizonans living with arthritis including many our patients, our colleagues, and more than 6,000 children in Arizona alone. TOCA is proud to continue our support the 2018 Arizona Walk to Cure Arthritis on May 5th at the Phoenix Zoo. As a sponsor of the Walk to Cure Arthritis, our goal is to help more people with arthritis.

The Arthritis Foundation is the Champion of Yes for patients with arthritis who are being told “no” a lot. No, there isn’t a cure. No, you cannot play sports. No, you cannot pick-up your grandchild.

Here is how you can help!

• Through funding critical research for osteoarthritis to find better treatments and ultimately a cure.
• Giving kids living with arthritis the opportunity to attend Camp Cruz to meet other kids living with arthritis.
• Supporting programs like the Live Yes network for people in our community struggling with pain, connecting them with others with arthritis.
• Getting a patient get back on their feet so they can walk their dog.
• Helping a grandparent alleviate back pain so they can pick up their grandchild.
• Saying “YES” to a patient today!

The event features a three-mile and one-mile course, with arthritis information and activities for the entire family!

Let’s raise funds to find a cure for arthritis, then come together to support each other and walk! Every step counts, every dollar matters!  The Arthritis Foundation’s Walk to Cure Arthritis to help the more than 50 million Americans and 300,000 children with arthritis live better today and to keep the Arthritis Foundation’s promise of finding a cure for tomorrow. Be a Champion of Yes – join our team and raise funds to fight arthritis and find a cure, all while having A LOT OF FUN! If you aren’t able to join the team, we’d appreciate your donation to help reach our goal.

Click here to learn more about this event, join Team TOCA and/or Donate Today! Team TOCA

Event Location:
The Phoenix Zoo
455 N Galvin Pkwy
Phoenix , AZ 85008
Event Schedule:
Event Registration Starts 5/5/2017 6:30 am
Event Registration Ends 5/5/2017 8:00 am
Event Starts 5/5/2017 7:30 am
Event Ends 5/5/2017 10:00 am
Fees:
Walk to Cure Arthritis Registration: No Fees
Event Registration

To Learn more about Dr. Feng and TOCA visit: www.tocamd.com or call 602-277-6211

#Arthritisfoundation #WalktoCureArthritis #Results #Recovery #Relife#TOCAMD #TOCA #ArthritisPhxWalk #PhoenixZoo

Celebrate National PA (Physician Assistant) Week October 6 – 12th!

Each year from October 6-12, we celebrate National PA Week, which recognizes the PA profession and its contributions to the nation’s health.

This week is also an opportunity to raise awareness and visibility of the profession. Before it was a weeklong event, National PA Day was first celebrated on October 6, 1987, in honor of the 20th anniversary of the first graduating class of PAs from the Duke University PA program. October 6th is also the birthday of the profession’s founder, Eugene A. Stead, Jr., MD. Now the profession is 50 years strong!

History of the PA Profession

The PA profession was created to improve and expand healthcare.

In the mid-1960s, physicians and educators recognized there was a shortage of primary care physicians.

To help remedy this, Eugene A. Stead Jr., MD, of the Duke University Medical Center, put together the first class of PAs in 1965. He selected four Navy Hospital Corpsmen who had received considerable medical training during their military service. Stead based the curriculum of the PA program on his knowledge of the fast-track training of doctors during World War II.

The first PA class graduated from the Duke University PA program on Oct. 6, 1967.

The PA concept was lauded early on and gained federal acceptance and backing as early as the 1970s as a creative solution to physician shortages. The medical community helped support the new profession and spurred the setting of accreditation standards, establishment of a national certification process and standardized examination, and development of continuing medical education requirements.

What is a PA? (American Academy of PAs)

What is a PA?

A physician assistant (or PA) is a nationally certified and state-licensed medical professional. There are currently more than 100,000 clinically practicing PA’s in the United States! PA’s practice medicine on health care teams with physicians and other providers. They also prescribe medication in all 50 states.

 

What does a PA do? Well, at the most basic level, a PA is a medical practitioner who works under the supervision of a physician.

Physician assistants (PAs) work closely with doctors and handle duties that range from taking medical histories to setting simple fractures. They are allowed to prescribe medications in some states. Many PAs specialize in a particular area of medicine, such as pediatrics. A master’s degree is required, and all states require that PAs be licensed. Licensing requires passing a multiple-choice exam and completing continuing education courses to keep knowledge current.

Beyond the basic definition, however, the PA profession represents an essential part of the health care infrastructure in a number of important ways.

Physician assistants examine, diagnose and treat patients under the supervision of licensed physician. PAs can prepare casts or splints, suture small wounds and interpret medical tests. According to the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA), these medically-trained professionals can also prescribe medications (www.aapa.org).

Some PAs specialize in a particular area of medicine, such as emergency care or geriatrics, and can assist doctors in advanced medical techniques and procedures. Physician assistants are often the first line of medical care in rural and underserved areas. In some cases, a physician assistant will refer the patient to a medical doctor or make arrangements for transferring the patient to a hospital or clinic.

During this week, TOCA is excited to honor our amazing PAs and to say a big thank you. We appreciate your dedication to patient care, and we recognize the impact that you make in the lives of those patients every day.

To read more about the dedicated Physician Assistant staff at TOCA Click Here

To learn more about TOCA or to schedule an appointment call 602-277-6211

 

#Recovery #Results #Relief #TOCA #TOCAMD #PA #PAWeek #ThankAPA #Patientcare #PhysicianAssistant #PADay #MyOrthoDoc

Foot & Ankle Conditioning Program

After an injury or surgery, an exercise conditioning program will help you return to daily activities and enjoy a more active, healthy lifestyle. Following a well-structured conditioning program will also help you return to sports and other recreational activities.

This is a general conditioning program that provides a wide range of exercises. To ensure that the program is safe and effective for you, it should be performed under your doctor’s supervision. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist about which exercises will best help you meet your rehabilitation goals.

Strength: Strengthening the muscles that support your lower leg, foot, and ankle will help keep your ankle joint stable. Keeping these muscles strong can relieve foot and ankle pain and prevent further injury.

Flexibility: Stretching the muscles that you strengthen is important for restoring range of motion and preventing injury. Gently stretching after strengthening exercises can help reduce muscle soreness and keep your muscles long and flexible.

Target Muscles: The muscle groups of the lower leg are targeted in this conditioning program, as well as the tendons and ligaments that control movement in your feet. These include:

  • Gastrocnemius-soleus complex (calf)
  • Anterior tibialis (shin)
  • Posterior tibialis (center of calf)
  • Peroneus longus (outside of lower calf)
  • Peroneus brevis (outside of lower calf)
  • Soleus (calf)
  • Dorsiflexors (ankle)
  • Plantar flexors (ankle)
  • Invertors (ankle)
  • Evertors (ankle)

Length of program: This foot and ankle conditioning program should be continued for 4 to 6 weeks, unless otherwise specified by your doctor or physical therapist. After your recovery, these exercises can be continued as a maintenance program for lifelong protection and health of your feet and lower legs. Performing the exercises three to five days a week will maintain strength and range of motion in your foot and ankle.

 

Getting Started

Warm up: Before doing the following exercises, warm up with 5 to 10 minutes of low impact activity, like walking or riding a stationary bicycle.

Stretch: After the warm-up, do the stretching exercises shown on Page 1 before moving on to the strengthening exercises. When you have completed the strengthening exercises, repeat the stretching exercises to end the program.

Do not ignore pain: You should not feel pain during an exercise. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist if you have any pain while exercising.

Ask questions: If you are not sure how to do an exercise, or how often to do it, contact your doctor or physical therapist

 

1. Heel Cord Stretch

Repetitions 2 sets of 10
Days per week 6 to 7

Main muscles worked: Gastrocnemius-soleus complex
You should feel this stretch in your calf and into your heel

Equipment needed: None

Step-by-step directions

  • Stand facing a wall with your unaffected leg forward with a slight bend at the knee. Your affected leg is straight and behind you, with the heel flat and the toes pointed in slightly.
  • Keep both heels flat on the floor and press your hips forward toward the wall.
  • Hold this stretch for 30 seconds and then relax for 30 seconds. Repeat.

Tip Do not arch your back.

2. Heel Cord Stretch with Bent Knee

Repetitions 2 sets of 10
Days per week 6 to 7

Main muscles worked: Soleus
You should feel this stretch in your calf, the sides of your ankle, and into your heel

Equipment needed: None

Step-by-step directions

  • Stand facing a wall with your unaffected leg forward with a slight bend at the knee. Your affected leg is behind you, with the knee bent and the toes pointed in slightly.
  • Keep both heels flat on the floor and press your hips forward toward the wall.
  • Hold the stretch for 30 seconds and then relax for 30 seconds. Repeat.

Tip Keep your hips centered over both feet.

 

3. Golf Ball Roll

Repetitions 1
Days per week Daily

Main muscles worked: Plantar fascia ligament
You should feel this exercise along the bottom of your foot

Equipment needed: Golf ball

Step-by-step directions

  • Sit on a stable chair with both feet planted on the floor.
  • Roll a golf ball under the arch of your affected foot for 2 minutes.

Tip Sit up tall and keep your foot toward your chair.

 

4. Towel Stretch

Repetitions 2 sets of 10
Days per week 6 to 7

Main muscles worked: Gastrocnemius-soleus complex
You should feel this stretch in your calf and into your heel

Equipment needed: Hand towel

Step-by-step directions

  • Sit on the floor with both legs out in front of you.
  • Loop a towel around the ball of your affected foot and grasp the ends of the towel in your hands.
  • Keep your affected leg straight and pull the towel toward you.
  • Hold for 30 seconds and then relax for 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

Tip Sit up tall and keep your legs straight.

 

 

5. Calf Raises

Repetitions 2 sets of 10
Days per week6 to 7

Main muscles worked: Gastrocnemius-soleus complex
You should feel this exercise in your calf

Equipment needed: Chair for support

Step-by-step directions

  • Stand with your weight evenly distributed over both feet. Hold onto the back of a chair or a wall for balance.
  • Lift your unaffected foot off of the floor so that all of your weight is placed on your affected foot.
  • Raise the heel of your affected foot as high as you can, then lower.
  • Repeat 10 times.

Tip Do not bend the knee of your working leg.

 

5. Ankle Range of Motion

Repetitions 2 sets
Days per week Daily

Main muscles worked: Dorsiflexors, plantar flexors, invertors, evertors
You should feel this exercise at the top of your foot and throughout your ankle

Equipment needed: None

Step-by-step directions

  • Sit down so that your feet do not touch the floor.
  • Use your foot to write each letter of the alphabet in the air. Lead with your big toe.

Tip Keep the movements small, using just your foot and ankle.

 

 

6. Marble Pickup

Repetitions 20
Days per week Daily

Main muscles worked: Plantar flexors
You should feel this exercise at the top of your foot and toes

Equipment needed: 20 marbles

Step-by-step directions

  • Sit with both feet flat and place 20 marbles on the floor in front of you.
  • Use your toes to pick up one marble at a time and place into a bowl.
  • Repeat until you have picked up all the marbles.

Tip Do not place the marbles too far out in front or to the side.

 

 

7. Towel Curls

Repetitions 5
Days per week Daily

Main muscles worked: Plantar flexors
You should feel this exercise at the top of your foot and your toes

Equipment needed: Hand towel

Step-by-step directions

  • Sit with both feet flat and place a small towel on the floor in front of you.
  • Grab the center of the towel with your toes and curl the towel toward you.
  • Relax and repeat.

Tip You can make this exercise more challenging by placing a weight on the edge of the towel.

 

 

8. Ankle Dorsiflexion/Plantar Flexion

Repetitions 3 sets of 10
Days per week 3

Main muscles worked: Anterior tibialis, gastrocnemius-soleus complex
You should feel this exercise at your calf, shin, the back of your heel, and the top of your foot

Equipment needed: Use an elastic stretch band of comfortable resistance

Step-by-step directions

  • Sit on the floor with your legs straight out in front of you.
  • For dorsiflexion, anchor the elastic band on a chair or table leg, then wrap it around your foot.
  • Pull your toes toward you and slowly return to the start position. Repeat 10 times.
  • For plantar flexion, wrap the elastic band around your foot and hold the ends in your hand.
  • Gently point your toes and slowly return to the start position. Repeat 10 times.

Tip Keep your leg straight and heel on the floor for support.

 

If you are experiencing foot and/or ankle pain the experts at TOCA are here to help! View our website for more information or call our dedicated team to schedule an appointment today at: 602-277-6211!

 

#Recovery #Results #Relief #MyOrthoDoc #TOCA #TOCAMD#orthopedics #footpain #anklepain #injuryrecovery

 

What you need to know: #NationalFlipFlopDay

What you need to know: #NationalFlipFlopDay

Flip-flops might make you feel like you’re on vacation, but they’re actually making your feet work overtime.

Fun and fashionable, flip-flops have their place in your shoe closet, experts say. But they’re not meant to be worn with abandon — or else you may be courting foot pain.

When you wear the thonged sandals, you have to slightly “clench” your toes to keep them on and that’s not a natural position for your feet.
See for yourself: Take your shoes off. Take a step, paying attention to how your midfoot and toes bend at the end as your heel leaves the floor.

Now slightly “clench” your toes, curling them down toward the pads of your feet. Take another step. It doesn’t feel the same, does it? Your foot will be stiffer, and the step won’t “flow” like the first step.

But let’s face it, Flip-flops are a summertime staple. So wear them—but put a cap on the distance you travel in the sandals. Like anything else, moderation is key: Slipping flip flops on by the pool or for a short jaunt likely won’t cause any harm — the problems arise when your thongs become your go-to summer shoes.

This constant tension alters your gait, eventually causing muscular issues in your feet and calves. That can lead to the painful condition plantar fasciitis—also called “jogger’s heel”—when you run. You’ll feel a sharp shooting pain in the bottom of your heels with each step. In extreme cases, flip-flops may even be the cause of other lower-body issues like knee pain.

What’s their best purpose?

“Flip-flops give you some basic protection to the bottom of your foot to walk around poolside or on a surface that may be warm during the summer,” says Jim Christina, DPM, director of scientific affairs for the American Podiatric Medical Association.Image result for flip flops and your foot health

They can also help prevent you from catching athlete’s foot or plantar warts in public showers, according to foot specialists.

Experts give flip-flops thumbs up for the poolside, thumbs down for foot pain

Why? “They let your foot be as flat as they can be,” Christina says. “For some people, that’s OK, depending on the structure of their foot. But if you have a foot that tends to over-flatten, then you’re not getting any support.

If you are walking in flip-flops for days on end with no support, it’s very common to see arch and heel pain.

Don’t overdo the flip-flops at home: everything in moderation. As long as you’re not doing a lot of walking, it’s probably OK. For example, To have flip-flops on for short periods of time to do errands, that’s usually not going to be a problem.

If you have foot pain and need an alternative to flip-flops and their flimsy support.

 

Flip-flop concerns and Safety.

Bacteria and Fungal Infections
Truth: Any open-toed shoe in a dirty environment (think: campgrounds, the beach, pool, or locker room) can lead to infections if your feet are exposed to fungus. Remember, fungus loves moist, warm environments. So to curb your risk of skin or toenail infections, keep your feet clean and dry.

Blisters
Flip flops tend to slip around on your foot more than a sneaker or flats, blisters are an inevitable part of wearing flip flops. Blame movement, moisture, and rubbing, says Ward. Of course, any shoe that doesn’t fit right can cause blistering, but flip flops are among the worst culprits because of their instability.

Heel and Toe Pain
Floppy sandals might not completely destroy your heels, but they could come close. Flip flops could cause serious pain or even conditions like plantar fasciitis, which occurs when the tissue that connects your heel bone to your toes becomes inflamed. See, the ligament that attaches your toes to your heel can stretch or even tear when it’s not appropriately supported. If you notice any redness, irritation or blisters developing between your toes, discontinue use of the flip-flops and find sandals that don’t separate your toes.

Posture Issues
Your feet are the building blocks for how your ankles, knees, hips, back, and shoulders are aligned. Take away the building blocks (which is what you do when you wear shoes with little support) and you’re left with a weak foundation. This can cause everything else in your body to collapse or be poorly aligned, leading to pain and issues with your posture.

Falling Objects

When you wear flip-flops, your toes and feet are exposed, making them susceptible to falling objects or people stepping on your toes.

Thin Soles

Unlike sturdy shoes, flip-flops aren’t good for extensive walking because they offer no arch support, heel cushioning, or shock absorption, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). Wearers can suffer foot pain due to lack of arch support, tendinitis, and even sprained ankles if they trip.

When shopping for flip-flops, test their flexibility before buying them. Grab one end of the flip-flop in each hand and gently bend it. If the flip-flop bends in half, this means that it won’t offer any support for your foot. But if it gives a little in the ball of the foot, this means it will properly support your foot and will move with your foot while you’re walking.

Thong Effect

The Auburn study indicates that the thongs in the middle mean you have to grip the shoe to keep it on. The thong can actually rub against the skin and causes ulcerations and sores. Also, when you have a toe thong, you tend to grip the shoe with your toes to try and keep it on. That alters your gait and puts strain on muscles you don’t normally use when you walk in regular shoes.

Also, a recent study found that men and women who wear flip-flops actually strike the ground with less force than when they wear sneakers, again altering the way you walk and causing you to take shorter steps, which may account for why people who wear them for extended periods experience lower leg pain and have more heel problems, such as heel spurs (little bony growths on the heel) and plantar strain (inflammation of the sheet of tissue covering the bottoms of the feet).

Skin Cancer

If you flip-flop your way through lazy summer days, don’t forget: your exposed feet need sunscreen, too. Because your feet are exposed to the sun, it’s important to cover them with sunscreen when your wear flip-flops. It’s easy to forget your feet when applying sunscreen, but it’s a crucial area to protect. Those little brown spots of sun damage that can eventually turn into skin cancer can be difficult to detect on the feet, especially if they’re on or between the toes. So next time, you plan to have some fun in the sun, protect your feet first.

Skip The Flip-Flops If You Have Or Are Prone To Foot Injuries

If you have any foot injuries, it’s best to stay away from flip-flops until those injuries have healed. If you have diabetes, you should skip the flip-flops altogether as you may acquire an injury without feeling it. If you’re overweight, it’s best to wear a closed-in shoe that will provide more support for the feet, ankles and back.

[Related – Diabetic Foot Pain And Complications]

Driving Hazard (avoid driving in flip-flops)

Flip-flops can impair a driver’s control if they come off the foot and lodge under the brake or gas pedal, according to Bill Van Tassel, PhD, the American Automobile Association’s manager of driver training operations. “Whatever you wear on your feet, make sure it’s not so loose that it pops off and interferes with the pedals,” he says.

Decreasing the Dangers

  • Use sun block and check your feet for any suspicious moles.
  • Don’t walk long distances or play sports in your flip-flops – they’re really made for walking along the beach or by the pool or if you get into a public shower, not for long strolls.
  • Do not Spruce up the yard in flip flops – You may accidentally drop something on your foot, stub your toe, cut it on a piece of glass or get bitten by something you’re allergic to
  • Choose flip-flops with thick soles, which will provide more cushion for your feet and protect you from sharp objects you might encounter on the street.

 

How to Pick a Better Pair!

Don’t fret: There is hope for cute summer shoes. For one, look for a sandal with more than one strap, which will help with stability, suggests Ward. An ankle strap or latch behind your heel may also help cut down how much the shoe moves on your foot.

So, enjoy your flip-flops, but just not all the time and without giving them any thought!

Your foot health should always be a priority. If you suffer from a foot/ankle condition the dedicated team of physicians and staff here at TOCA are here to help! For more information, questions or to schedule an appointment call 602-277-6211!

 

 

Sources:

 

Cast Away: Fishing Safety & Boating in Arizona

Cast Away: Fishing Safety & Boating in Arizona! Arizona is blessed with diverse fishing opportunities, from the large reservoirs to the trout lakes in the mountains, and plenty of low-elevation fishing holes in between. Go out and catch a memory!

Recreational fishing (especially angling) is one of the most popular activities in the world, but as with other sports, it’s not without its risks. Most anglers are careful to avoid the obvious and most dramatic of fishing dangers (dehydration, hooking a finger, boat motor fires, accidental drowning, etc.). However, if you want to keep yourself in top fishing shape, you also have to protect yourself from more mundane fishing hazards – overuse injuries.

As the name states, overuse injuries are caused by too many uninterrupted repetitions of an action. The body parts involved become fatigued to the point of injury; this effect is intensified if the repeated action requires awkward or unnatural movements, such as is sometimes seen in bowling or pitching a baseball. Overuse injuries are notoriously stubborn to cure – but then again, it’s often those with the injuries that are stubborn. Because you must treat an overuse injury with rest (which means taking a sometimes lengthy break from the beloved activity that cause the injury in the first place), many people make the mistake of returning to activity before their injury is fully healed, creating a vicious cycle that can be difficult to break.

Angling provides the perfect conditions for an overuse injury thanks to the repetitive movements of casting coupled with the bad body mechanics that are common to so many people. As is often said, prevention is the best medicine. With a few simple tweaks, you can help stop overuse injuries from ruining your fishing trips.

Although it might sound silly, you should prepare in advance of a fishing trip the way you would for other athletic events. Keeping yourself in good physical condition will give you the endurance you need for long fishing sessions, and you will be less plagued by the aches and pains that can make your trip less enjoyable. Besides eating a balanced diet and exercising regularly, you should include stretching and strengthening exercises specifically geared for the muscles you will use during angling – your abdominals, back, and upper body.
Because fishing trips are often all-day affairs, it’s important to change up your activity. Alternate sitting and standing – but do both with good posture – to avoid unnecessary stress on your back and feet. Switch your grip and casting style throughout the day so no one motion or position is repeated excessively (and as an added bonus, this will help you master a diversity of fishing styles). And perhaps most important of all, take breaks to rest, even if you don’t feel tired. Remember that most people don’t realize they are developing an overuse injury until it’s too late.

Lastly, be realistic about your abilities. Seek coaching to fix any bad body mechanics you may have during casting. Shooting heads and sinking weights put extra strain on the wrists, elbows, and shoulders of anglers who aren’t adept at their use, so avoid them for all but short periods of time if you fall into this category. In addition, using heavy or long rods, longer lines, and fishing for heavy fish should all be engaged in sparingly unless you are expert enough to do so correctly.

Fishing memories can last a lifetime, so don’t let an overuse injury keep you from enjoying the water with your friends and family.
You throw a hook into the water, you sit and wait for a bite or you reel back in. Fishing is a great pastime, but in order for it to be truly enjoyable, you must be safe. Keep these important guidelines and tips in mind for a safe fishing experience.Image result for arizona fishing

1. Get physically prepared.
You don’t necessarily need to be in top physical shape to catch a fish, but you do need to be able to navigate in and out of a boat or possibly across rocks to your favorite fishing spot. Since regular physical activity is essential for your family’s health, make sure you stick to a daily fitness routine leading up to fishing season. Consider visiting the local pool to brush up on your swimming strokes in the case you fall out of the boat or into the water from the shore.

2. Check your fishing gear.
Fishing lines get old and tangled, fishing poles get worn, and lures can break. Open up your tackle box and discard broken fishing tackle. Restring your pole if the line looks ragged and replace your reel or pole if showing signs of damage. The last thing you want to do is cast out and hook someone or yourself due to faulty fishing gear. If you are going out on a boat, do a boat safety check and make sure your life vests are in good condition.

3. Dress up for the occasion.
Sturdy, protective footwear is especially important when fishing. It can keep you from cutting your foot on obstacles in the water or on shore, keep your feet warm, and prevent slipping. Wear clothing according to the weather conditions, choosing attire that will keep you cool in the heat and warm in the cold. Wear sunscreen regardless of temperature and consider a hat that shades your ears and face. Be sure you and the kids don those life vests if you are on the water. Life jackets are also important if you are wading in deep waters that have strong currents. Even if you are an excellent swimmer, a life jacket can help keep you safe in the event that you fall and hit your head.

4. Pack a first aid kit.
Image result for first aid kitWhile you are hoping for the big catch, you may fall and sustain a cut, get bit by insects, or get a hook in the hand. A first aid kit can come to the rescue for many injuries.
For scrapes and cuts, rinse the wound with clean water (this doesn’t mean pond water) and stop the bleeding by compressing with a clean cloth. Apply an antibiotic cream and cover with a bandage. Try to keep the area dry, changing bandage as needed.

For insect bites and stings, clean area with water, apply a cold compress if available, apply antibiotic cream, and take acetominophen or ibuprofen for pain. Be sure to remove ticks and stingers, if present, before treating. To avoid bites and stings, apply an insect repellent before you start fishing.

When it comes to fishing hooks, if the hook is embedded in the head or face, in a joint, or near an artery, seek medical help immediately. If the hook is embedded in the finger or elsewhere in the skin, clean area with soapy water. Tie a long piece of fishing line to the rounded part of the hook. Push the hook shank parallel with the skin and give the fishing line a firm, sharp yank. The hook should come right out of the entry point. Wash the area again and apply an antiobiotic ointment and bandage to keep it clean and dry.
Note: Be sure your family is current on your tetanus vaccinations.

5. Stay aware of your fellow fishers.
Keep distance between you and your fellow fishers to avoid hook or pole injuries when casting. Safety glasses are a good idea for kids to protect their eyes, especially as they hone their fishing skills. In addition, always know where your family members are and don’t let your kids fish alone. Employ the buddy system.
New anglers. Should always learn how to cast overhead first. This cast teaches the proper technique and is safer than side casts.

6. Never go fishing alone. Always fish with someone else and, ideally, with two other people. If one person is injured or in danger, a second person can stay with them while the third person seeks help. This is especially important when rock fishing. Let somebody know the location of your fishing trip, who you are going with and an approximate time you will be back.

7. Weather and fishing
Staying aware of weather conditions is an important part of fishing safety. Make sure you have the most up-to-date local weather information available and be prepared for sudden changes. For coastal locations, take particular note of unexpected tide and swell conditions.

Additional Fishing and Boating Safety Tips: 
• No drinking or using drugs while driving a boat.
• Abide by boat speeds and wake zone laws.
• Stay alert of debris, stumps, boulders when boating.
• Stay off of the water if there are lightning storms.
• Use your boat lights at night.
• Keep an extra fully-charged battery on board.
• Use caution with hooks, like baiting, knot tying, rigging.
• Don’t fish in unrestricted zones.
• Be sure you keep your area organized and clean.
• Carry maps of the areas you will be at.
• Bring a cell phone.
• Stay hydrated.

Arizona fishing and boating trips can range from a day of casting for trophy largemouth bass to fly-fishing for brown trout on Woods Canyon Lake. In order to experience the best fishing in Arizona, check for updates to fishing regulations, read local fishing reports, and find the best spot.

These 11 Amazing Spots In Arizona Are Perfect To Go Fishing
Image result for arizona fishing• Big Lake
• Cluff Ranch Ponds
• Dead Horse Lake
• Dogtown Lake
• Lake Pleasant
• Lake Powell
• Oak Creek
• Peña Blanca Lake
• Riggs Flat Lake
• Saguaro Lake
• Tonto Creek

 

 

If you experience an injury during your summer activities the Team at TOCA is here to help! Learn more about our Orthopedic Surgeons, Sports Medicine Physicians and Physical Therapy Team. To schedule an appointment call 602-277-6211!

Read more about summer time outdoors in Arizona: Arizona Hiking Tips: Take a Hike. Do it Right.     10 Common Summer Injuries  Men’s Summer Health & Common Sports Injuries

#Results #Recovery #Relief #family #summer #fishingfun #fishingsafety #TOCA #TOCAMD #AZFishing

Ankle Sprain

Ankle Sprain

Ankle sprains are very common injuries. There’s a good chance that while playing as a child or stepping on an uneven surface as an adult you sprained your ankle–some 25,000 people do it every day.​​​

Sometimes, it is an awkward moment when you lose your balance, but the pain quickly fades away and you go on your way. But the sprain could be more severe; your ankle might swell and it might hurt too much to stand on it. If it’s a severe sprain, you might have felt a “pop” when the injury happened.

Even though ankle sprains  are common, they are not always minor injuries. Some people with repeated or severe sprains can develop long-term joint pain and weakness. Treating a sprained ankle can help prevent ongoing ankle problems.

A sprained ankle means one or more ligaments on the outer side of your ankle were stretched or torn. If a sprain is not treated properly, you could have long-term problems. Typically the ankle is rolled either inward (inversion sprain) or outward (eversion sprain). Inversion sprains cause pain along the outer side of the ankle and are the most common type. Pain along the inner side of the ankle may represent a more serious injury to the tendons or to the ligaments that support the arch and should always be evaluated by a doctor.

With a mild sprain, the ankle may be tender, swollen, and stiff. But it usually feels stable, and you can walk with little pain. A more serious sprain might include bruising and tenderness around the ankle, and walking is painful. In a severe ankle sprain, the ankle is unstable and may feel “wobbly.”

More about Your Injury

There are 3 grades of ankle sprains:

  • Grade I sprains: Your ligaments are stretched. It is a mild injury that can improve with some light stretching.
  • Grade II sprains: Your ligaments are partially torn. You may need to wear a splint or a cast.
  • Grade III sprains: Your ligaments are fully torn. You may need surgery for this severe injury.

The last 2 kinds of sprains are often associated with tearing of small blood vessels. This allows blood to leak into tissues and cause black and blue color in the area. The blood may not appear for several days. Most of the time it is absorbed from the tissues within 2 weeks.

If your sprain is more severe:

  • You may feel strong pain and have a lot of swelling.
  • You may not be able to walk, or walking may be painful.

Some ankle sprains may become chronic (long-lasting). If this happens to you, your ankle may continue to be:

  • Painful and swollen
  • Weak or giving way easily

What to Expect

Your health care provider may order an x-ray to look for a bone fracture, or an MRI scan to look for an injury to the ligament.

To help your ankle heal, your provider may treat you with a brace, a cast, or a splint, and may give you crutches to walk on. You may be asked to place only part or none of your weight on the bad ankle. You will also need to do physical therapy or exercises to help you recover from the injury.

Self-care

You can decrease swelling by:

  • Resting and not putting weight on your foot

Ice it to keep down the swelling. Don’t put ice directly on the skin (use a thin piece of cloth such as a pillow case between the ice bag and the skin) Apply ice every hour while you are awake, 20 minutes at a time and covered by a towel or bag, for the first 24 hours after the injury. After the first 24 hours, apply ice 20 minutes 3 to 4 times per day.

  • Compression can help control swelling as well as immobilize and support your injury.
  • Elevating your foot on a pillow at or above the level of your heart
  • Pain medicines, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, may help to ease pain and swelling. You can buy these medicines without a prescription. DO NOT use these drugs for the first 24 hours after your injury. They may increase the risk of bleeding. DO NOT take more than the amount recommended on the bottle or more than your provider advises you to take. Carefully read the warnings on the label before taking any medicine.

Getting Active

The pain and swelling of an ankle sprain most often gets better within 48 hours. After that, you can begin to put weight back on your injured foot.

  • Put only as much weight on your foot as is comfortable at first. Slowly work your way up to your full weight.
  • If your ankle begins to hurt, stop and rest.

 

Rehabilitating your Sprained Ankle

Every ligament injury needs rehabilitation. Otherwise, your sprained ankle might not heal completely and you might re-injure it. All ankle sprains, from mild to severe, require three phases of recovery:

  • Phase I includes resting, protecting and reducing swelling of your injured ankle.
  • Phase II includes restoring your ankle’s flexibility, range of motion and strength.
  • Phase III includes gradually returning to straight-ahead activity and doing maintenance exercises, followed later by more cutting sports such as tennis, basketball or football.

Once you can stand on your ankle again, your doctor will prescribe exercise routines to strengthen your muscles and ligaments and increase your flexibility, balance and coordination. Later, you may walk, jog and run figure eights with your ankle taped or in a supportive ankle brace.

It’s important to complete the rehabilitation program because it makes it less likely that you’ll hurt the same ankle again. If you don’t complete rehabilitation, you could suffer chronic pain, instability and arthritis in your ankle. If your ankle still hurts, it could mean that the sprained ligament has not healed right, or that some other injury also happened.

To prevent future sprained ankles, pay attention to your body’s warning signs to slow down when you feel pain or fatigue, and stay in shape with good muscle balance, flexibility and strength in your soft tissues.

Talk to your provider before returning to more intense sports or work activities.

When to Call the Doctor

You should call your provider if you notice any of the following:

  • You cannot walk, or walking is very painful.
  • The pain does not get better after ice, rest, and pain medicine.
  • Your ankle does not feel any better after 5 to 7 days.
  • Your ankle continues to feel weak or gives away easily.
  • Your ankle is increasingly discolored (red or black and blue), or it becomes numb or tingly.

 

If you have an Foot or Ankle Injury, the dedicated team of Orthopedic Physicians and Physical Therapists are here to help. For questions or to schedule an appointment call 602-277-6211!

 

#Results #Recovery #Relief #anklesprain #injuryprevention #sportsinjury #orthopedicinjury #TOCA #TOCAMD #physicaltherapy #healmyankle

 

Men’s Summer Health & Common Sports Injuries

The summer is a great time to build up your fitness program, enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables, take a vacation, and have fun. It’s also a time to pay attention to your health and safety. Below are tips to help you stay safe and healthy this summer and all year long.

Sprains, strains, tendonitis, and even broken bones are all consequences of living an active and athletic lifestyle. Luckily, with the right knowledge and preparation, many injuries can be diminished or entirely prevented.

There are two classes of injuries: traumatic and cumulative. Traumatic injuries are those accidents that happen in sport or daily life, such as rolling your ankle on a trail run or crashing your bike on the morning commute. Cumulative injuries relate to tissue damage that occurs over time as a result of repetitive strain. These types of injuries creep up and may be a function of poor posture, faulty movement patterns, or improper training.

 

The Seven Most Common Sports Injuries

What weekend warriors need to know about preventing and treating the seven most common sports injuries!

After a sedentary work week, end-zone catches and 36-hole weekends can take their toll in common sports injuries. The seven most common sports injuries are:

  1. Ankle sprain
  2. Groin pull
  3. Hamstring strain
  4. Shin splints
  5. Knee injury: ACL tear
  6. Knee injury: Patellofemoral syndrome — injury resulting from the repetitive movement of your kneecap against your thigh bone
  7. Tennis elbow (epicondylitis)

To see how to prevent and treat these common sports injuries — and to learn when it’s time to look further than your medicine cabinet to treat sports injuries— read on.

The most common sports injuries are strains and sprains

Sprains are injuries to ligaments, the tough bands connecting bones in a joint. Suddenly stretching ligaments past their limits deforms or tears them. Strains are injuries to muscle fibers or tendons, which anchor muscles to bones. Strains are called “pulled muscles” for a reason: Over-stretching or overusing a muscle causes tears in the muscle fibers or tendons.

“Think of ligaments and muscle-tendon units like springs,” says William Roberts, MD, sports medicine physician at the University of Minnesota and spokesman for the American College of Sports Medicine. “The tissue lengthens with stress and returns to its normal length — unless it is pulled too far out of its normal range.”

Preventing the most common sports injuries

Sometimes preventing common sports injuries is beyond our control, but many times sports injuries are preventable. “Some injuries,” Roberts says, “we bring on ourselves because we’re not conditioned for the activity.” His advice: “Work out daily and get double benefit — enjoy your weekend activities and garner the health benefits.”

Every workout should start with a gentle warm-up to prevent common sports injuries, says Margot Putukian, MD, director of athletic medicine at Princeton University. “Getting warmed up increases blood flow to the muscles, gets you more flexible, and could decrease injuries,” she adds.

Overuse injuries are common and preventable, according to Putukian. “Don’t come out and hit the ball for an hour after not playing for a while,” she says. Whether it’s hiking, running, or team sports, do some “pre-participation training” first by lightly working the relevant muscle groups in the weeks before the activity.

And learn to recognize when you’ve already left it all on the field. Stop when you are fatigued. Muscle fatigue takes away all your protective mechanisms and really increases your risk of all injuries. You can always come out to play again next weekend — if you don’t get injured today.

Treating the most common sports injuries

Usually, common sports injuries are mild or moderate — there’s some damage, but everything is still in place. You can treat them at home using the PRICE therapy method described later in this article. But you should expect that some common sports injuries may take months to heal, even with good treatment. If a sprain or strain is severe, however, the entire muscle, tendon, or ligament is torn away, and surgery may be needed.

Here are some specific tips for treating each of the most common sports injuries:

1. Ankle sprain

What it is: Most athletes have experienced a sprained ankle, which typically occurs when the foot turns inward. This turning stretches or tears the ligaments on the outside of the ankle, which are relatively weak.

What you can do: With an ankle sprain, it’s important to exercise to prevent loss of flexibility and strength — and re-injury. You can ask your doctor or physical therapist to help you know what kinds of exercise you should do.

When to see a doctor: It’s important to note where the sprain has occurred. A ‘high ankle sprain’ is slower to heal and should probably be seen by a doctor to make sure the bones in the lower leg did not separate. One way to recognize a high ankle sprain is that this sprain usually causes tenderness above the ankle.

2. Groin pull

What it is: Pushing off in a side-to-side motion causes strain of the inner thigh muscles, or groin. Hockey, soccer, football, and baseball are common sports with groin injuries.

What you can do: Compression, ice, and rest will heal most groin injuries. Returning to full activity too quickly can aggravate a groin pull or turn it into a long-term problem.

When to see a doctor: Any groin pull that has significant swelling should be seen early by a physician.

3. Hamstring strain

What it is: Three muscles in the back of the thigh form the hamstring. The hamstring can be over-stretched by movements such as hurdling — kicking the leg out sharply when running. Falling forward while waterskiing is another common cause of hamstring strains.

What you can do: Hamstring injuries are slow to heal because of the constant stress applied to the injured tissue from walking. Complete healing can take six to 12 months. Re-injuries are common because it’s hard for many guys to stay inactive for that long.

4. Shin splints

What they are: Pains down the front of the lower legs are commonly called “shin splints.” They are most often brought on by running — especially when starting a more strenuous training program like long runs on paved roads.

What you can do: Rest, ice, and over-the-counter pain medicine are the mainstays of treatment.

When to see a doctor: The pain of shin splints is rarely an actual stress fracture — a small break in the shin bone. But you should see your doctor if the pain persists, even with rest. Stress fractures require prolonged rest, commonly a month or more to heal.

5. Knee injury: ACL tear

What it is: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) holds the leg bone to the knee. Sudden “cuts” or stops or getting hit from the side can strain or tear the ACL. A complete tear can make the dreaded “pop” sound.

When to see a doctor: Always, if you suspect an ACL injury. ACL tears are potentially the most severe of the common sports injuries. “A completely torn ACL will usually require surgery in individuals who wish to remain physically active.

6: Knee injury: Patellofemoral syndrome

What it is: Patellofemoral syndrome can result from the repetitive movement of your kneecap (patella) against your thigh bone (femur), which can damage the tissue under the kneecap. Running, volleyball, and basketball commonly set it off. One knee or both can be affected.

What you can do: Patience is key. Patellofemoral pain can take up to six weeks to clear up. It’s important to continue low-impact exercise during this time. Working out the quadriceps can also relieve pain.

7. Tennis elbow (epicondylitis)

What it is: Repetitive use of the elbow — for example, during golf or tennis swings — can irritate or make tiny tears in the elbow’s tendons. Epicondylitis is most common in 30- to 60-year-olds and usually involves the outside of the elbow.

What you can do: Epicondylitis can usually be cleared up by staying off the tennis court or golf course until the pain improves.

The PRICE principle for treating common sports injuries

The U.S. Marines say that “pain is weakness leaving your body.” Most of the rest of us would add, “OK, but can’t we hurry it up a little?” The answer is yes. Using the PRICE method to treat any common sports injury will help get you back in the game sooner.

First, it’s important to know that swelling is a normal response to these injuries. Excessive swelling, though, can reduce range of motion and interfere with healing. You can limit swelling and start healing faster after common sports injuries by using the PRICE principle:

  • P — protect from further injury
    For more severe injuries, protect the injured area with a splint, pad, or crutch.
  • R — restrict activity
    Restricting activity will prevent worsening of the injury.
  • I — apply ice
    Apply ice immediately after a common sports injury. “Ice is the miracle drug” for sports injuries, says Putukian. “It’s an anti-inflammatory, without many side effects.” Use ice for 20 minutes every one to two hours for the first 48 hours after the injury. Don’t use heat during this time — it encourages swelling and inflammation.
  • C — apply compression
    Compression with an elastic bandage will help reduce swelling.
  • E — elevate the injured area
    Elevating the injured area above the heart will also reduce swelling.

Over-the-counter pain relievers usually relieve the pain of common sports injuries to a tolerable level. If they don’t, it’s probably time to see a doctor.

When to get medical attention for common sports injuries

We know you’re tough — but you also need to be smart. If you suspect a serious injury or if you have any of these signs, see a doctor:

  • Deformities in the joint or bone — it looks “crooked,” or moves abnormally
  • You cannot bear weight or can’t use the limb without it “giving way”
  • Excessive swelling
  • Changes in skin color beyond mild bruising
  • It’s not getting any better after a few days of PRICE therapy

 

If you are injured the Team of Orthopedic Physicians here at TOCA are here to help! To learn more or schedule an appointment call: 602-277-6211.

 

#Results #Recovery #Relief #Injuryprevention #Menshealth #ShowUsYourBlue #SportsMedicine #SportsInjury #TOCA #TOCAMD

10 Common Summer Injuries

10 Common Summer Injuries – Summer is a season full of beautiful weather, vacations, sports, and other enjoyable outdoor activities. Unfortunately, summer also means an increase in injuries. There are many ways to prevent the injuries that are most common during the summer months, as you and your family enjoy the warm weather. Here you can find helpful tips and facts to help you have a safe and injury-free summer.

1. BICYCLE INJURIES: Wearing a helmet will reduce the chance of a head injury by 85 percent, according to the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute. The use of a bicycle helmet also seriously reduces the chance that a bike accident, which often involves a motor vehicle, will be fatal for the cyclist

2. BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL INJURIES: Since baseball is a non-contact sport, injuries happen with unintentional contact, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. Warming up and stretching can help prevent common strains and sprains. Coaches are also advised to become very familiar with the conditions of their field, and to be prepared for emergency situations with an on-hand first aid kit along with a medical response plan.

3. PLAYGROUND INJURIES: Studies indicate that roughly 7 out of 10 playground injuries happen because of a fall or an equipment failure. Pediatricians are acutely aware of such hazards.

* Ground cover is important. Stay away from concrete and grass. The best ground covering is rubber or wood chips. Also, look for rusty nails or broken equipment.

* Remember to apply sunscreen regularly while enjoying an outdoor playground.

4. ATV, MOPED AND MINI BIKE INJURIES: The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission advises against using ATVs on paved roads, allowing children under the age of 16 to ride adult ATVs, or riding an ATV as a passenger. Additionally, that government agency urges ATV enthusiasts to always wear helmets and protective gear.

5. SOCCER INJURIES: Proper conditioning, stretching, warmups and cool-downs are key to preventing many of these injuries including the severe sprains, torn cartilage and damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs).

6. SWIMMING INJURIES: When spending time at a pool, lake or shoreline with family and friends, designate brief shifts in which an adult is always serving as a “water watcher.”

Here are some other swimming safety tips:

* Never dive into shallow water.

* Jump into lakes, rivers or the sea feet-first, particularly in dark waters, where you can’t see what’s below.

* Stop swimming during inclement weather.

* Try to avoid crowded swimming spots where it’s hard to monitor your group.

* Avoid wearing headphones at the pool or beach, so you can hear any developing trouble.

7. TRAMPOLINE INJURIES: On average orthopedic physicians see one to three patients each week with a trampoline injury. Sprains and fractures are the most common among them but bruises, bumps and bloody noses are also a concern. Here are some of this doctor’s trampoline safety recommendations:

* Allow only one person on a trampoline at any given time.

* Use a trampoline net to minimize falls.

* Make sure the trampoline is situated on a relatively soft surface such as a lawn.

* Make sure the trampoline is secure.

* Keep the trampoline well-maintained. Any damage to the supporting bars or mats present a fresh safety danger.

* Untrained tumblers should avoid somersaults and other “high-risk maneuvers.”

8. VOLLEYBALL INJURIES: Staying fit during the off-season is the best way for regular players to avoid injury during games. Recreational players should remember to stretch and warm up before a game, wear sunscreen and stay hydrated.

9. AM– USEMENT PARK, STATE FAIR AND CARNIVAL RIDE INJURIES: The following are the top ride safety tips from the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions (IAAPA).

* Mind the posted height, weight and health restrictions on each ride.

* Read any posted safety rules for each ride. Responsible parks also have attendants who remind riders about safety rules at the start of each ride.

* Never dangle your hands or feet outside of a ride.

* Always stay in your seat during a ride.

* Always use the straps, belts, crossbars and any other ride safety equipment.

* Make sure your possessions are secure.

10. WATER SPORTS INJURIES: Many of these injuries can be prevented with preseason conditioning and a purposeful warm up before your exercise.

Although doctors regularly treat cuts, strains, sprains and orthopedic injuries from such water sports as jet-skiing and wakeboarding, they also caution against dehydration, which outdoor enthusiasts may forget about while frolicking in or near water.

The team members at TOCA and our Physicians are here to help! To learn more about TOCA and our physicians visit more of our webpages here on: www.tocamd.com or call 602-277-6211!

#Recovery #Results #Relief #TOCAMD #SummerFun #InjuryPrevention#PlaySmart #PlaySafe #SummerSaftey

Dr. Cummings and Vito Berlingeri talk Golf, injuries and recovery in the latest addition of the AZ Golf Insider!

Dr. Cummings and Vito Berlingeri talk Golf, injuries and recovery in the latest addition of the AZ Golf Insider. Check out the full artical by clicking here: http://staging.yudu.com/…/…/45vcVtT1Y15VmxzM/html/index.html

“When I went into his office, Dr. Cummings greeted me like he had known me for 30 years”, said Berlingeri. “He told me with surgery and physical rehab, I would be back to hitting golf balls within seven weeks.”

That’s exactly what happened, with Berlingeri able to play 18 holes just three months after surgery.

Associated with TOCA since 2001, Dr. Cummings estimates that up to 40% of the patients he sees play golf, including numerous PGA Tour professionals. No matter the skill level, he encourages all golfers to take injury prevention measures, especially keeping your core strong.

“Your body only has so much time before wear and tear happens. I’ve recommended other golfer friends with injuries go to Dr. Cummings at TOCA ever since.” (said Vito Berlingeri)

Getting an accurate diagnosis and then a plan is critical to the process, Berlingeri and his physician (Dr. Dean Cummings) agreed.

“You have to spend at least 10-15 minutes warming up in what I call a combination dynamic and static workout. That’s doing some stretches plus some movement patterns. I also recommend stretching while you’re playing.”

“At TOCA we provide an excellent assessment while looking at the whole body and not just an individual body part,” Dr. Cummings said. “We also make sure that each patient is treated with conservative therapeutic management first, and then surgery if needed. I think we have doctors in our group who are phenomenally gifted, but the good thing is they know when to operate, which is very important.”

Dr. P. Dean Cummings is an Orthopedic Surgeon & Sports Medicine Physician and Surgeon at TOCA.

To learn more about Dr. Cummings and TOCA or to schedule an appointment visit: www.tocamd.com or call 602-277-6211!

#Results #Recovery #Relife #Golf #AZGolf #AZGolfInsider #AGA#BunkertoBunker #TOCA #TOCAMD