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Dr. Lederman, Dr. Lund and former fellows have described a new class of labral tears in the shoulder*

Title: The Glenoid Labral Articular Teardrop Lesion: A Chondrolabral Injury With Distinct Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

Evan S. Lederman MD, Stephen Flores MD, Christopher Stevens MD, Damien Richardson MD, Pamela Lund MD

*Identification of this lesion of MRI can help in diagnosis and treatment of labral tears.

Purpose

Evaluation and description of a pathognomonic lesion identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a chondrolabral injury of the glenohumeral joint.

Methods

Patients were prospectively identified at the time of MRI by a characteristic teardrop appearance of a pedicled displaced chondrolabral flap in the axillary recess on coronal imaging and retrospectively reviewed.

Full article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2017.08.236

Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery

Volume 34, Issue 2, February 2018, Pages 407-411

 

Halloween Safety Tips from your OrthoDocs

Halloween is known as a favorite holiday, full of spooky fun and lots of candy. However, it can also present many opportunities for injury, as we take to the streets in pursuit of trick-or-treating goodies. Let’s talk Halloween Safety!

Monsters and aliens are not the only scary things out on October 31st. Trips and falls (or even more serious accidents) can put a damper on Halloween festivities. But a little preparation and thought can go a long way in protecting you and your children from harm.Pedestrian injuries are the most common type of Halloween injury. There are four to five times more pedestrian fatalities on Halloween versus the average for the rest of the year.

Other common Halloween injuries are trips and falls from costumes that are too big or obstruct sight; burns from highly-flammable costumes; and cuts while carving pumpkins.

The following tips taken from the American Academy of Pediatrics and physicians at TOCA offers the following tips for Halloween safety:

Halloween Safety Tips from your OrthoDocs!

REMEMBER: The main thing to do is use your own common sense and rust your parental instincts. If it doesn’t feel safe or comfortable, then it probably isn’t; go with your gut, follow our advice, and keep things safe this Halloween.

Choosing a Costume

Everyone loves dressing up at Halloween, children most of all. And it’s so sweet seeing them go from door-to-door trick or treating locally – who doesn’t take a million pictures before they go out with their little buckets? But sadly it can be dangerous for some children, as there have been a number of well-documented accidents where children’s Halloween costumes were set alight by accident.

Don’t worry too much though- there are lots of things you can do to mitigate the risk. You need to make sure what you buy is as safe as it can be from candles, fires and sparks, and you need to brief them on what to look out for, as well as what to do if the worst happens. We’re sure everyone will stay safe this Halloween, but you can be super sure if you read our fullproof guide to Halloween costume safety!

1. Use flame-resistant materials

As it’s Halloween, your child is very likely to be near candles, lanterns, and other decorative flames. Polyester and nylon are both flame-resistant materials, for example. When picking out your child’s costume always look for the label “flame-resistant” and make sure there is a visible CE mark.

REMEMBER: It’s safer to choose costumes made up of one layer of heavier materials as opposed to flimsy, layered, frilly ones. Thinner materials made up of lots of layers tend to burn much faster because more oxygen can get to the fire.

2. Pick a costume that’s made out of ONE material

Costumes that are made of one single type of material will often catch fire more slowly than those that are made out of lots of different materials.

If a costume is made of a variety of different fabrics, they can all react to a flame in a different way and, in some cases, can fuel the fire even faster.

3. Wear clothes UNDER the costume

Not only because it can go from warm to chilly here in Arizona when you’re trick or treating but also because it’s safer. Speaking about costumes, Kevin O’Neill from the Fire and Rescue Service said: “These are toys. Toys have a lower fire safety requirement. They have a lower fire safety standard. Just be aware of that and take measures.

One of those measures is to ensure children are wearing clothes under the costume.

They should be wearing woollen tights for example or a woollen jumper or jeans. That way it gives some protection that if they were to catch fire you’ve still got a barrier between the garment and your skin.”

4. Ditch the capes

Capes are very common on Halloween costumes, but – as proven by Madonna – they can pose a tripping hazard even to adults. More worryingly, however, is the fact that they pose a strangulation risk.

And on that note…

Avoid costumes and costume jewellery that is tight around the throat. Avoid anything, especially cords and sashes, that tie around the neck.

5. Read the label on face paints

If you are buying face paints then they should be FDA approved. Always look for a CE mark and always check the packaging displays clear ingredients in English.

And remember that the words ‘non-toxic’ doesn’t always mean it will be safe for your skin. Do an allergy test on a small patch of skin before using on you or your childs face.

No matter how tired you are following a night of fun, make sure you remove any costume makeup before bedroom to prevent possible skin irritation.

6. Keep an eye on accessories and props

Swords, knives, and other costume accessories should be short, soft, and flexible. If you think if you, a friend or your child would be hurt if their was a fall on the accessory, be it a wand or a sword, then do not wear it.

Again, look for a visible CE mark when purchasing.

7. Be careful with masks

You want to make sure that a mask fits well (so that it’s comfortable and doesn’t slip), that the eye holes are big enough to see out of, and that you can breathe comfortably while wearing it.

8. Remember to stay visible

Choose bright and light coloured costumes and clothing wherever possible. If you or your kids are heading out trick-or-treating or an outdoor party, carry a glow stick, and buy reflective tape and attach it to your/ your childs costume. This will ensure that motorists can see your child – and that you can keep an eye on them!

9. Don’t forget the shoes!

Related imageWear well-fitting, sturdy shoes. You don’t need to wear “red-carpet starlet” high heels; leave them at home and pop on sturdy footwear that you won’t trip in.

And, on the note, remember that many shoes that come with costumes are NOT meant for outdoor use; make sure your child is wearing shoes that fit properly and have proper grip to them, so that they don’t slip and fall. Also so they can comfortably survive the night walking around in their shoes.

10. And of course, make sure it fits

Do not purchase costumes that are flimsy, billowing, too big, or that drag on the ground; not only will this be a tripping hazard, but it could also get caught up in Halloween candles.

A Few Additional Halloween Safety Precautions:

While Out Trick or Treating

  • Be safe, be seen. To easily see and be seen, children should also carry flashlights.
  • Young children should always be accompanied by an adult or an older, responsible child.
  • All children should WALK, not run, from house to house and use the sidewalk, if available, rather than walk in the street.
  • Cross streets at the corner, use crosswalks (where they exist), and do not cross between parked cars.
  • Parents should plan out the trick-or-treating route – best to stay on well lit roads with sidewalks.
  • Children should be cautioned against running out from between parked cars or across lawns and yards where ornaments, furniture, or clotheslines present dangers.
  • For greater visibility during dusk and darkness, decorate or trim costumes with reflective tape that will glow in the beam of a car’s headlights. Bags or sacks should also be light colored or decorated with reflective tape. Reflective tape is usually available in hardware, bicycle, and sporting goods stores.
  • Bring a flashlight and cell phone with you.

Choose Safe Houses

  • Children should go only to homes where the residents are known and have outside lights on as a sign of welcome.
  • Children should not enter homes or apartments unless they are accompanied by an adult.
  • People expecting trick-or-treaters should remove anything that could be an obstacle from lawns, steps and porches.

Image result for jack-o-lanternSmart Jack-o’-lanterns

  • Use a flashlight, battery tea light or flameless candle to light your jack-o’’-lantern.

When carving pumpkins:

    • Carve pumpkins on stable, flat surfaces with good lighting.
    • Have children draw a face on the outside of the pumpkin, then let an adult do the cutting.
    • Place lighted pumpkins away from curtains and other flammable objects, and do not leave lit pumpkins unattended

 

RESOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics
http://www.aap.org

 

#TOCA #TOCAMD #Halloween #HalloweenSafety #KidSafe #MyOrthoDoc #HalloweenFun #Trickortreat #Halloweencostume #Holidays #Celebrate #HappyHalloween

The Orthopedic Clinic Association names John Kinna Chief Executive Officer

The Orthopedic Clinic Association

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 6, 2017
Media Contact: Lisa Paulson, Director of Marketing
lpaulson@tocamd.com; Office: 602.512.8525; Cell: 602.501.7583

The Orthopedic Clinic Association names John Kinna Chief Executive Officer

TOCA – The Orthopedic Clinic Association, a leading Orthopedic Clinic in Arizona, led by nationally recognized Orthopedic Physicians, has appointed John Kinna as Chief Executive Officer, effective October 2, 2017.

“John Kinna has a distinguished record of accomplishment and dedication to the critically important role of Orthopedics. “As we plan for the future, Kinna’s commitment to combining the highest levels of quality with outstanding patient experience will help achieve TOCA’s inspiring vision for the future,” said Joseph Haber, M.D., President of The Orthopedic Clinic Association. “John will build on the many strengths of the past and we are confident he will ably lead the association into the future.”

“TOCA is a trusted and admired, one stop resource for Orthopedics in Arizona. It is a tremendous opportunity for me to join an organization as distinguished as they are. I’m eager to work with TOCA’s skilled and respected physicians’ and staff, and together provide the best possible patient experience and outcomes.

Kinna has worked in healthcare for the past 29 years in leadership and management roles in both not for profit and for profit systems in Montana, Washington and now Arizona, including private practices, and large integrated groups as well as two large Catholic healthcare systems running employed Physician Divisions. He has served as the CEO at Barrow Brain and Spine and most recently at OrthoArizona.

About TOCA – The Orthopedic Clinic Association

TOCA (The Orthopedic Clinic Association) is the best one stop resource for orthopedics in Arizona, led by nationally recognized orthopedic physicians. We are passionate about consistent quality, the most advanced treatment options and personalized patient care for superior lifetime outcomes.

TOCA has built a reputation for excellence in Arizona for more than 65 years as the first and foremost orthopedic group. Our Nationally and Internationally recognized orthopedic physicians and surgeons utilize the most advanced proven technologies for the best recovery possible to return you to your active lifestyle.

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To learn more about TOCA’s physicians read more Here. For more information on TOCA’s history read more Here. To contact TOCA find more information by clicking Here

#Recovery #Results #Relief #MyOrthoDoc #TOCA #TOCAMD #JohnKinna #NewCEO

TOCA on Facebook  TOCA on LinkedIN TOCA on Pinterest  TOCA on Twitter

NUsurface Meniscus Surgery: Are You a Candidate?

NUsurface Meniscus Surgery: Are You a Candidate?

Your Life Arizona talks with orthopedic surgeon Dr. Tom Carter and NUsurface Meniscus Implant recipient Robert Nowlan about a clinical trial for knee pain after meniscus surgery. For more information on the trial, please call (844) 680-8951.

Have you had surgery to repair a torn meniscus but are still living with knee pain? Have you been told that you’re too young for knee replacement surgery and thought you were out of options? If you answered yes to these questions, you may be a candidate for the NUsurface Meniscus Implant – a medial meniscus replacement to treat persistent knee pain caused by injured or deteriorating meniscus cartilage.

The implant, which is made of medical grade plastic and inserted in to the knee through a small incision, has been used in Europe since 2008 and Israel since 2011. A clinical trial called SUN (Safety Using NUsurface®) is taking place at TOCA (The Orthopedic Clinic Association) to determine the effectiveness of the NUsurface Meniscus Implant for individuals with knee pain. More information about this study can be found here.

While it’s not meant to take the place of a total knee replacement, the NUsurface Meniscus Implant can serve as an opportunity to treat knee pain and keep you active until knee replacement surgery, if needed, is a viable option. The unique materials and composite structure are designed to mimic the function of a natural meniscus and redistribute loads transmitted across the knee joint. To date, the implant has given nearly 100 patients a second chance at a pain-free, active life.

About the Procedure

The meniscus implant is inserted into the knee through a small incision, and patients are allowed to go home the same day or the day after the operation. After surgery, they undergo a six-week rehabilitation program and a physician will explain recommended activities during this period.

Who is Eligible?

If you’re interested in the NUsurface Meniscus Implant, ask yourself the following questions to determine if you might be eligible to participate in this clinical trial:

  • Have you had a previous medial partial meniscectomy that was performed at least six months ago?
  • Do you have persistent knee pain?
  • Has your physician recommended non-surgical therapies to deal with the pain?
  • Are you between the ages of 30 and 75?

Please note patients who are candidates for partial or total knee arthroplasty are not eligible.

How Can I Find Out if I Qualify?

Visit sun-trial.com, call (844) 680-8951 or contact the dedicated TOCA Team at 602-277-6211

Learn more about Dr. Carter Here

TOCA (The Orthopedic Clinic Association) performs the first meniscus replacement in Arizona read more Here

 

#MyOrthoDoc #TOCAMD #TOCA #YourLifeAtoZ #ActiveImplants #MeniscusReplacement

Backpack Safety!

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]When you move your child’s backpack after he or she drops it at the door, does it feel like it contains 40 pounds of rocks? Maybe you’ve noticed your child struggling to put it on, bending forward while carrying it, or complaining of tingling or numbness. If you’ve been concerned about the effects that extra weight might have on your child’s still-growing body, your instincts are correct. Backpacks that are too heavy can cause a lot of problems for kids, like back and shoulder pain, and poor posture. Did you know that according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, injuries from heavy backpacks result in more than 7,000 emergency room visits per year. Sprains, strains, and “overuse” injuries were among the top complaints.

When selecting a backpack, look for:

  • An ergonomic design
  • The correct size: never wider or longer than your child’s torso and never hanging more than 4 inches below the waist
  • Padded back and shoulder straps
  • Hip and chest belts to help transfer some of the weight to the hips and torso
  • Multiple compartments to better distribute the weight
  • Compression straps on the sides or bottom to stabilize the contents
  • Reflective material

Backpack Safety Tips:

  • Your backpack should weigh only 15% – 20% of your total weight
  • Use both shoulder straps to keep the weight of the backpack better distributed
  • Tighten the straps to keep the load closer to the back
  • Organize items and pack heavier things low and towards the center
  • Remove items if the backpack is too heavy and only carry items necessary for the day
  • Lift properly by bending at the knees when picking up a backpack

Remember: A roomy backpack may seem like a good idea, but the more space there is to fill, the more likely your child will fill it. Make sure your child uses both straps when carrying the backpack. Using one strap shifts the weight to one side and causes muscle pain and posture problems.

Help your child determine what is absolutely necessary to carry. If it’s not essential, leave it at home.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

 

If you or your child is experiencing neck or back pain the expert Physicians at TOCA and the dedicated staff are here to help! Call 602-277-6211 to schedule your appointment today!

 

#Recovery #Results #Relief #BackpackSaftey #MyOrthoDoc #BacktoSchool

Ankle Sprain

Ankle Sprain

Ankle sprains are very common injuries. There’s a good chance that while playing as a child or stepping on an uneven surface as an adult you sprained your ankle–some 25,000 people do it every day.​​​

Sometimes, it is an awkward moment when you lose your balance, but the pain quickly fades away and you go on your way. But the sprain could be more severe; your ankle might swell and it might hurt too much to stand on it. If it’s a severe sprain, you might have felt a “pop” when the injury happened.

Even though ankle sprains  are common, they are not always minor injuries. Some people with repeated or severe sprains can develop long-term joint pain and weakness. Treating a sprained ankle can help prevent ongoing ankle problems.

A sprained ankle means one or more ligaments on the outer side of your ankle were stretched or torn. If a sprain is not treated properly, you could have long-term problems. Typically the ankle is rolled either inward (inversion sprain) or outward (eversion sprain). Inversion sprains cause pain along the outer side of the ankle and are the most common type. Pain along the inner side of the ankle may represent a more serious injury to the tendons or to the ligaments that support the arch and should always be evaluated by a doctor.

With a mild sprain, the ankle may be tender, swollen, and stiff. But it usually feels stable, and you can walk with little pain. A more serious sprain might include bruising and tenderness around the ankle, and walking is painful. In a severe ankle sprain, the ankle is unstable and may feel “wobbly.”

More about Your Injury

There are 3 grades of ankle sprains:

  • Grade I sprains: Your ligaments are stretched. It is a mild injury that can improve with some light stretching.
  • Grade II sprains: Your ligaments are partially torn. You may need to wear a splint or a cast.
  • Grade III sprains: Your ligaments are fully torn. You may need surgery for this severe injury.

The last 2 kinds of sprains are often associated with tearing of small blood vessels. This allows blood to leak into tissues and cause black and blue color in the area. The blood may not appear for several days. Most of the time it is absorbed from the tissues within 2 weeks.

If your sprain is more severe:

  • You may feel strong pain and have a lot of swelling.
  • You may not be able to walk, or walking may be painful.

Some ankle sprains may become chronic (long-lasting). If this happens to you, your ankle may continue to be:

  • Painful and swollen
  • Weak or giving way easily

What to Expect

Your health care provider may order an x-ray to look for a bone fracture, or an MRI scan to look for an injury to the ligament.

To help your ankle heal, your provider may treat you with a brace, a cast, or a splint, and may give you crutches to walk on. You may be asked to place only part or none of your weight on the bad ankle. You will also need to do physical therapy or exercises to help you recover from the injury.

Self-care

You can decrease swelling by:

  • Resting and not putting weight on your foot

Ice it to keep down the swelling. Don’t put ice directly on the skin (use a thin piece of cloth such as a pillow case between the ice bag and the skin) Apply ice every hour while you are awake, 20 minutes at a time and covered by a towel or bag, for the first 24 hours after the injury. After the first 24 hours, apply ice 20 minutes 3 to 4 times per day.

  • Compression can help control swelling as well as immobilize and support your injury.
  • Elevating your foot on a pillow at or above the level of your heart
  • Pain medicines, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, may help to ease pain and swelling. You can buy these medicines without a prescription. DO NOT use these drugs for the first 24 hours after your injury. They may increase the risk of bleeding. DO NOT take more than the amount recommended on the bottle or more than your provider advises you to take. Carefully read the warnings on the label before taking any medicine.

Getting Active

The pain and swelling of an ankle sprain most often gets better within 48 hours. After that, you can begin to put weight back on your injured foot.

  • Put only as much weight on your foot as is comfortable at first. Slowly work your way up to your full weight.
  • If your ankle begins to hurt, stop and rest.

 

Rehabilitating your Sprained Ankle

Every ligament injury needs rehabilitation. Otherwise, your sprained ankle might not heal completely and you might re-injure it. All ankle sprains, from mild to severe, require three phases of recovery:

  • Phase I includes resting, protecting and reducing swelling of your injured ankle.
  • Phase II includes restoring your ankle’s flexibility, range of motion and strength.
  • Phase III includes gradually returning to straight-ahead activity and doing maintenance exercises, followed later by more cutting sports such as tennis, basketball or football.

Once you can stand on your ankle again, your doctor will prescribe exercise routines to strengthen your muscles and ligaments and increase your flexibility, balance and coordination. Later, you may walk, jog and run figure eights with your ankle taped or in a supportive ankle brace.

It’s important to complete the rehabilitation program because it makes it less likely that you’ll hurt the same ankle again. If you don’t complete rehabilitation, you could suffer chronic pain, instability and arthritis in your ankle. If your ankle still hurts, it could mean that the sprained ligament has not healed right, or that some other injury also happened.

To prevent future sprained ankles, pay attention to your body’s warning signs to slow down when you feel pain or fatigue, and stay in shape with good muscle balance, flexibility and strength in your soft tissues.

Talk to your provider before returning to more intense sports or work activities.

When to Call the Doctor

You should call your provider if you notice any of the following:

  • You cannot walk, or walking is very painful.
  • The pain does not get better after ice, rest, and pain medicine.
  • Your ankle does not feel any better after 5 to 7 days.
  • Your ankle continues to feel weak or gives away easily.
  • Your ankle is increasingly discolored (red or black and blue), or it becomes numb or tingly.

 

If you have an Foot or Ankle Injury, the dedicated team of Orthopedic Physicians and Physical Therapists are here to help. For questions or to schedule an appointment call 602-277-6211!

 

#Results #Recovery #Relief #anklesprain #injuryprevention #sportsinjury #orthopedicinjury #TOCA #TOCAMD #physicaltherapy #healmyankle

 

Men’s Summer Health & Common Sports Injuries

The summer is a great time to build up your fitness program, enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables, take a vacation, and have fun. It’s also a time to pay attention to your health and safety. Below are tips to help you stay safe and healthy this summer and all year long.

Sprains, strains, tendonitis, and even broken bones are all consequences of living an active and athletic lifestyle. Luckily, with the right knowledge and preparation, many injuries can be diminished or entirely prevented.

There are two classes of injuries: traumatic and cumulative. Traumatic injuries are those accidents that happen in sport or daily life, such as rolling your ankle on a trail run or crashing your bike on the morning commute. Cumulative injuries relate to tissue damage that occurs over time as a result of repetitive strain. These types of injuries creep up and may be a function of poor posture, faulty movement patterns, or improper training.

 

The Seven Most Common Sports Injuries

What weekend warriors need to know about preventing and treating the seven most common sports injuries!

After a sedentary work week, end-zone catches and 36-hole weekends can take their toll in common sports injuries. The seven most common sports injuries are:

  1. Ankle sprain
  2. Groin pull
  3. Hamstring strain
  4. Shin splints
  5. Knee injury: ACL tear
  6. Knee injury: Patellofemoral syndrome — injury resulting from the repetitive movement of your kneecap against your thigh bone
  7. Tennis elbow (epicondylitis)

To see how to prevent and treat these common sports injuries — and to learn when it’s time to look further than your medicine cabinet to treat sports injuries— read on.

The most common sports injuries are strains and sprains

Sprains are injuries to ligaments, the tough bands connecting bones in a joint. Suddenly stretching ligaments past their limits deforms or tears them. Strains are injuries to muscle fibers or tendons, which anchor muscles to bones. Strains are called “pulled muscles” for a reason: Over-stretching or overusing a muscle causes tears in the muscle fibers or tendons.

“Think of ligaments and muscle-tendon units like springs,” says William Roberts, MD, sports medicine physician at the University of Minnesota and spokesman for the American College of Sports Medicine. “The tissue lengthens with stress and returns to its normal length — unless it is pulled too far out of its normal range.”

Preventing the most common sports injuries

Sometimes preventing common sports injuries is beyond our control, but many times sports injuries are preventable. “Some injuries,” Roberts says, “we bring on ourselves because we’re not conditioned for the activity.” His advice: “Work out daily and get double benefit — enjoy your weekend activities and garner the health benefits.”

Every workout should start with a gentle warm-up to prevent common sports injuries, says Margot Putukian, MD, director of athletic medicine at Princeton University. “Getting warmed up increases blood flow to the muscles, gets you more flexible, and could decrease injuries,” she adds.

Overuse injuries are common and preventable, according to Putukian. “Don’t come out and hit the ball for an hour after not playing for a while,” she says. Whether it’s hiking, running, or team sports, do some “pre-participation training” first by lightly working the relevant muscle groups in the weeks before the activity.

And learn to recognize when you’ve already left it all on the field. Stop when you are fatigued. Muscle fatigue takes away all your protective mechanisms and really increases your risk of all injuries. You can always come out to play again next weekend — if you don’t get injured today.

Treating the most common sports injuries

Usually, common sports injuries are mild or moderate — there’s some damage, but everything is still in place. You can treat them at home using the PRICE therapy method described later in this article. But you should expect that some common sports injuries may take months to heal, even with good treatment. If a sprain or strain is severe, however, the entire muscle, tendon, or ligament is torn away, and surgery may be needed.

Here are some specific tips for treating each of the most common sports injuries:

1. Ankle sprain

What it is: Most athletes have experienced a sprained ankle, which typically occurs when the foot turns inward. This turning stretches or tears the ligaments on the outside of the ankle, which are relatively weak.

What you can do: With an ankle sprain, it’s important to exercise to prevent loss of flexibility and strength — and re-injury. You can ask your doctor or physical therapist to help you know what kinds of exercise you should do.

When to see a doctor: It’s important to note where the sprain has occurred. A ‘high ankle sprain’ is slower to heal and should probably be seen by a doctor to make sure the bones in the lower leg did not separate. One way to recognize a high ankle sprain is that this sprain usually causes tenderness above the ankle.

2. Groin pull

What it is: Pushing off in a side-to-side motion causes strain of the inner thigh muscles, or groin. Hockey, soccer, football, and baseball are common sports with groin injuries.

What you can do: Compression, ice, and rest will heal most groin injuries. Returning to full activity too quickly can aggravate a groin pull or turn it into a long-term problem.

When to see a doctor: Any groin pull that has significant swelling should be seen early by a physician.

3. Hamstring strain

What it is: Three muscles in the back of the thigh form the hamstring. The hamstring can be over-stretched by movements such as hurdling — kicking the leg out sharply when running. Falling forward while waterskiing is another common cause of hamstring strains.

What you can do: Hamstring injuries are slow to heal because of the constant stress applied to the injured tissue from walking. Complete healing can take six to 12 months. Re-injuries are common because it’s hard for many guys to stay inactive for that long.

4. Shin splints

What they are: Pains down the front of the lower legs are commonly called “shin splints.” They are most often brought on by running — especially when starting a more strenuous training program like long runs on paved roads.

What you can do: Rest, ice, and over-the-counter pain medicine are the mainstays of treatment.

When to see a doctor: The pain of shin splints is rarely an actual stress fracture — a small break in the shin bone. But you should see your doctor if the pain persists, even with rest. Stress fractures require prolonged rest, commonly a month or more to heal.

5. Knee injury: ACL tear

What it is: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) holds the leg bone to the knee. Sudden “cuts” or stops or getting hit from the side can strain or tear the ACL. A complete tear can make the dreaded “pop” sound.

When to see a doctor: Always, if you suspect an ACL injury. ACL tears are potentially the most severe of the common sports injuries. “A completely torn ACL will usually require surgery in individuals who wish to remain physically active.

6: Knee injury: Patellofemoral syndrome

What it is: Patellofemoral syndrome can result from the repetitive movement of your kneecap (patella) against your thigh bone (femur), which can damage the tissue under the kneecap. Running, volleyball, and basketball commonly set it off. One knee or both can be affected.

What you can do: Patience is key. Patellofemoral pain can take up to six weeks to clear up. It’s important to continue low-impact exercise during this time. Working out the quadriceps can also relieve pain.

7. Tennis elbow (epicondylitis)

What it is: Repetitive use of the elbow — for example, during golf or tennis swings — can irritate or make tiny tears in the elbow’s tendons. Epicondylitis is most common in 30- to 60-year-olds and usually involves the outside of the elbow.

What you can do: Epicondylitis can usually be cleared up by staying off the tennis court or golf course until the pain improves.

The PRICE principle for treating common sports injuries

The U.S. Marines say that “pain is weakness leaving your body.” Most of the rest of us would add, “OK, but can’t we hurry it up a little?” The answer is yes. Using the PRICE method to treat any common sports injury will help get you back in the game sooner.

First, it’s important to know that swelling is a normal response to these injuries. Excessive swelling, though, can reduce range of motion and interfere with healing. You can limit swelling and start healing faster after common sports injuries by using the PRICE principle:

  • P — protect from further injury
    For more severe injuries, protect the injured area with a splint, pad, or crutch.
  • R — restrict activity
    Restricting activity will prevent worsening of the injury.
  • I — apply ice
    Apply ice immediately after a common sports injury. “Ice is the miracle drug” for sports injuries, says Putukian. “It’s an anti-inflammatory, without many side effects.” Use ice for 20 minutes every one to two hours for the first 48 hours after the injury. Don’t use heat during this time — it encourages swelling and inflammation.
  • C — apply compression
    Compression with an elastic bandage will help reduce swelling.
  • E — elevate the injured area
    Elevating the injured area above the heart will also reduce swelling.

Over-the-counter pain relievers usually relieve the pain of common sports injuries to a tolerable level. If they don’t, it’s probably time to see a doctor.

When to get medical attention for common sports injuries

We know you’re tough — but you also need to be smart. If you suspect a serious injury or if you have any of these signs, see a doctor:

  • Deformities in the joint or bone — it looks “crooked,” or moves abnormally
  • You cannot bear weight or can’t use the limb without it “giving way”
  • Excessive swelling
  • Changes in skin color beyond mild bruising
  • It’s not getting any better after a few days of PRICE therapy

 

If you are injured the Team of Orthopedic Physicians here at TOCA are here to help! To learn more or schedule an appointment call: 602-277-6211.

 

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