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Dr. Lederman was a recent invited lecturer at the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons Annual Meeting 2018

 

Complex Shoulder Arthroplasty: Primary and Revision, Anatomic and Reverse, Three-Dimensional Planning – When and How? A case-based, comprehensive review of shoulder arthroplasty.

Moderator: Asheesh Bedi, MD: Panelists: Evan Lederman, Anthony Romeo, Gilles Walch, JP Warner, Brad Parsons, john Tokish, David Dines, Josh Dines, Michael Freehill, Xinning Li

New Orleans, LA – AAOS 2018 – American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) 2018 Annual meeting at the Ernest Morial Convention Center ,Tuesday March 6, 2018. With over 30,000 attendees, the conference is the preeminent meeting on musculoskeletal education to orthopaedic surgeons and allied health professionals in the world.

Congratulations to Dr. Evan Lederman, Top Doc!

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Congratulations to TOCA Physician and Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Evan Lederman, who was named as a Top Orthopedic Surgeon 2017 in the Phoenix Magazine Top Doc’s 2018 publication.

The TOCA Physicians and Orthopedic Surgeons have been ranked in Phoenix Magazine’s Top Docs consecutively since 2004!

Dr. Lederman is board certified in orthopedic surgery and subspecialty board certified in orthopedic sports medicine. Dr. Lederman has been practicing in Phoenix, Arizona since 1996. He has years of experience with specialty training in sports medicine, minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder and knee and complex reconstructive surgery. His practice encourages non-operative care when possible and considers surgery only when necessary. Dr. Lederman specializes in all disorders of the shoulder including advanced techniques for rotator cuff repair, shoulder instability repair, acromioclavicular joint repair and primary and revision shoulder replacement including reversed shoulder replacement and also specializes in knee arthroscopy and ACL reconstruction.

Dr. Lederman’s work has earned him acceptance as an associate member of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and is only the second surgeon in Arizona to receive this prestigious honor. He has been awarded the distinction of Phoenix Magazine’s Top Doc and Phoenix SuperDoctors. He has been named one of the “20 of the Top North American Shoulder Surgeons: 2015″ by Orthopedics This Week.

To schedule an appointment with one of TOCA’s physicians call 602-277-6211 today!

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Join Team TOCA with Dr. Feng & the Arthritis Foundation for the Walk to Cure Arthritis!

Enjoy the beautiful Arizona weather by joining Team TOCA, Dr. Earl Feng (Orthopedic Surgeon, Arthritis & Total Joint Reconstruction) and the Arthritis Foundation in the Annual Walk for the Cure, Saturday May 5th, 2018 at the Phoenix Zoo! Dr. Feng is not only a TOCA Physician & Surgeon but also serves as a Board Member for the Arthritis Foundation!

At TOCA, each of us has an important role in helping the more than 1.2 million Arizonans living with arthritis including many our patients, our colleagues, and more than 6,000 children in Arizona alone. TOCA is proud to continue our support the 2018 Arizona Walk to Cure Arthritis on May 5th at the Phoenix Zoo. As a sponsor of the Walk to Cure Arthritis, our goal is to help more people with arthritis.

The Arthritis Foundation is the Champion of Yes for patients with arthritis who are being told “no” a lot. No, there isn’t a cure. No, you cannot play sports. No, you cannot pick-up your grandchild.

Here is how you can help!

• Through funding critical research for osteoarthritis to find better treatments and ultimately a cure.
• Giving kids living with arthritis the opportunity to attend Camp Cruz to meet other kids living with arthritis.
• Supporting programs like the Live Yes network for people in our community struggling with pain, connecting them with others with arthritis.
• Getting a patient get back on their feet so they can walk their dog.
• Helping a grandparent alleviate back pain so they can pick up their grandchild.
• Saying “YES” to a patient today!

The event features a three-mile and one-mile course, with arthritis information and activities for the entire family!

Let’s raise funds to find a cure for arthritis, then come together to support each other and walk! Every step counts, every dollar matters!  The Arthritis Foundation’s Walk to Cure Arthritis to help the more than 50 million Americans and 300,000 children with arthritis live better today and to keep the Arthritis Foundation’s promise of finding a cure for tomorrow. Be a Champion of Yes – join our team and raise funds to fight arthritis and find a cure, all while having A LOT OF FUN! If you aren’t able to join the team, we’d appreciate your donation to help reach our goal.

Click here to learn more about this event, join Team TOCA and/or Donate Today! Team TOCA

Event Location:
The Phoenix Zoo
455 N Galvin Pkwy
Phoenix , AZ 85008
Event Schedule:
Event Registration Starts 5/5/2017 6:30 am
Event Registration Ends 5/5/2017 8:00 am
Event Starts 5/5/2017 7:30 am
Event Ends 5/5/2017 10:00 am
Fees:
Walk to Cure Arthritis Registration: No Fees
Event Registration

To Learn more about Dr. Feng and TOCA visit: www.tocamd.com or call 602-277-6211

#Arthritisfoundation #WalktoCureArthritis #Results #Recovery #Relife#TOCAMD #TOCA #ArthritisPhxWalk #PhoenixZoo

Halloween Safety Tips from your OrthoDocs

Halloween is known as a favorite holiday, full of spooky fun and lots of candy. However, it can also present many opportunities for injury, as we take to the streets in pursuit of trick-or-treating goodies. Let’s talk Halloween Safety!

Monsters and aliens are not the only scary things out on October 31st. Trips and falls (or even more serious accidents) can put a damper on Halloween festivities. But a little preparation and thought can go a long way in protecting you and your children from harm.Pedestrian injuries are the most common type of Halloween injury. There are four to five times more pedestrian fatalities on Halloween versus the average for the rest of the year.

Other common Halloween injuries are trips and falls from costumes that are too big or obstruct sight; burns from highly-flammable costumes; and cuts while carving pumpkins.

The following tips taken from the American Academy of Pediatrics and physicians at TOCA offers the following tips for Halloween safety:

Halloween Safety Tips from your OrthoDocs!

REMEMBER: The main thing to do is use your own common sense and rust your parental instincts. If it doesn’t feel safe or comfortable, then it probably isn’t; go with your gut, follow our advice, and keep things safe this Halloween.

Choosing a Costume

Everyone loves dressing up at Halloween, children most of all. And it’s so sweet seeing them go from door-to-door trick or treating locally – who doesn’t take a million pictures before they go out with their little buckets? But sadly it can be dangerous for some children, as there have been a number of well-documented accidents where children’s Halloween costumes were set alight by accident.

Don’t worry too much though- there are lots of things you can do to mitigate the risk. You need to make sure what you buy is as safe as it can be from candles, fires and sparks, and you need to brief them on what to look out for, as well as what to do if the worst happens. We’re sure everyone will stay safe this Halloween, but you can be super sure if you read our fullproof guide to Halloween costume safety!

1. Use flame-resistant materials

As it’s Halloween, your child is very likely to be near candles, lanterns, and other decorative flames. Polyester and nylon are both flame-resistant materials, for example. When picking out your child’s costume always look for the label “flame-resistant” and make sure there is a visible CE mark.

REMEMBER: It’s safer to choose costumes made up of one layer of heavier materials as opposed to flimsy, layered, frilly ones. Thinner materials made up of lots of layers tend to burn much faster because more oxygen can get to the fire.

2. Pick a costume that’s made out of ONE material

Costumes that are made of one single type of material will often catch fire more slowly than those that are made out of lots of different materials.

If a costume is made of a variety of different fabrics, they can all react to a flame in a different way and, in some cases, can fuel the fire even faster.

3. Wear clothes UNDER the costume

Not only because it can go from warm to chilly here in Arizona when you’re trick or treating but also because it’s safer. Speaking about costumes, Kevin O’Neill from the Fire and Rescue Service said: “These are toys. Toys have a lower fire safety requirement. They have a lower fire safety standard. Just be aware of that and take measures.

One of those measures is to ensure children are wearing clothes under the costume.

They should be wearing woollen tights for example or a woollen jumper or jeans. That way it gives some protection that if they were to catch fire you’ve still got a barrier between the garment and your skin.”

4. Ditch the capes

Capes are very common on Halloween costumes, but – as proven by Madonna – they can pose a tripping hazard even to adults. More worryingly, however, is the fact that they pose a strangulation risk.

And on that note…

Avoid costumes and costume jewellery that is tight around the throat. Avoid anything, especially cords and sashes, that tie around the neck.

5. Read the label on face paints

If you are buying face paints then they should be FDA approved. Always look for a CE mark and always check the packaging displays clear ingredients in English.

And remember that the words ‘non-toxic’ doesn’t always mean it will be safe for your skin. Do an allergy test on a small patch of skin before using on you or your childs face.

No matter how tired you are following a night of fun, make sure you remove any costume makeup before bedroom to prevent possible skin irritation.

6. Keep an eye on accessories and props

Swords, knives, and other costume accessories should be short, soft, and flexible. If you think if you, a friend or your child would be hurt if their was a fall on the accessory, be it a wand or a sword, then do not wear it.

Again, look for a visible CE mark when purchasing.

7. Be careful with masks

You want to make sure that a mask fits well (so that it’s comfortable and doesn’t slip), that the eye holes are big enough to see out of, and that you can breathe comfortably while wearing it.

8. Remember to stay visible

Choose bright and light coloured costumes and clothing wherever possible. If you or your kids are heading out trick-or-treating or an outdoor party, carry a glow stick, and buy reflective tape and attach it to your/ your childs costume. This will ensure that motorists can see your child – and that you can keep an eye on them!

9. Don’t forget the shoes!

Related imageWear well-fitting, sturdy shoes. You don’t need to wear “red-carpet starlet” high heels; leave them at home and pop on sturdy footwear that you won’t trip in.

And, on the note, remember that many shoes that come with costumes are NOT meant for outdoor use; make sure your child is wearing shoes that fit properly and have proper grip to them, so that they don’t slip and fall. Also so they can comfortably survive the night walking around in their shoes.

10. And of course, make sure it fits

Do not purchase costumes that are flimsy, billowing, too big, or that drag on the ground; not only will this be a tripping hazard, but it could also get caught up in Halloween candles.

A Few Additional Halloween Safety Precautions:

While Out Trick or Treating

  • Be safe, be seen. To easily see and be seen, children should also carry flashlights.
  • Young children should always be accompanied by an adult or an older, responsible child.
  • All children should WALK, not run, from house to house and use the sidewalk, if available, rather than walk in the street.
  • Cross streets at the corner, use crosswalks (where they exist), and do not cross between parked cars.
  • Parents should plan out the trick-or-treating route – best to stay on well lit roads with sidewalks.
  • Children should be cautioned against running out from between parked cars or across lawns and yards where ornaments, furniture, or clotheslines present dangers.
  • For greater visibility during dusk and darkness, decorate or trim costumes with reflective tape that will glow in the beam of a car’s headlights. Bags or sacks should also be light colored or decorated with reflective tape. Reflective tape is usually available in hardware, bicycle, and sporting goods stores.
  • Bring a flashlight and cell phone with you.

Choose Safe Houses

  • Children should go only to homes where the residents are known and have outside lights on as a sign of welcome.
  • Children should not enter homes or apartments unless they are accompanied by an adult.
  • People expecting trick-or-treaters should remove anything that could be an obstacle from lawns, steps and porches.

Image result for jack-o-lanternSmart Jack-o’-lanterns

  • Use a flashlight, battery tea light or flameless candle to light your jack-o’’-lantern.

When carving pumpkins:

    • Carve pumpkins on stable, flat surfaces with good lighting.
    • Have children draw a face on the outside of the pumpkin, then let an adult do the cutting.
    • Place lighted pumpkins away from curtains and other flammable objects, and do not leave lit pumpkins unattended

 

RESOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics
http://www.aap.org

 

#TOCA #TOCAMD #Halloween #HalloweenSafety #KidSafe #MyOrthoDoc #HalloweenFun #Trickortreat #Halloweencostume #Holidays #Celebrate #HappyHalloween

The Orthopedic Clinic Association names John Kinna Chief Executive Officer

The Orthopedic Clinic Association

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 6, 2017
Media Contact: Lisa Paulson, Director of Marketing
lpaulson@tocamd.com; Office: 602.512.8525; Cell: 602.501.7583

The Orthopedic Clinic Association names John Kinna Chief Executive Officer

TOCA – The Orthopedic Clinic Association, a leading Orthopedic Clinic in Arizona, led by nationally recognized Orthopedic Physicians, has appointed John Kinna as Chief Executive Officer, effective October 2, 2017.

“John Kinna has a distinguished record of accomplishment and dedication to the critically important role of Orthopedics. “As we plan for the future, Kinna’s commitment to combining the highest levels of quality with outstanding patient experience will help achieve TOCA’s inspiring vision for the future,” said Joseph Haber, M.D., President of The Orthopedic Clinic Association. “John will build on the many strengths of the past and we are confident he will ably lead the association into the future.”

“TOCA is a trusted and admired, one stop resource for Orthopedics in Arizona. It is a tremendous opportunity for me to join an organization as distinguished as they are. I’m eager to work with TOCA’s skilled and respected physicians’ and staff, and together provide the best possible patient experience and outcomes.

Kinna has worked in healthcare for the past 29 years in leadership and management roles in both not for profit and for profit systems in Montana, Washington and now Arizona, including private practices, and large integrated groups as well as two large Catholic healthcare systems running employed Physician Divisions. He has served as the CEO at Barrow Brain and Spine and most recently at OrthoArizona.

About TOCA – The Orthopedic Clinic Association

TOCA (The Orthopedic Clinic Association) is the best one stop resource for orthopedics in Arizona, led by nationally recognized orthopedic physicians. We are passionate about consistent quality, the most advanced treatment options and personalized patient care for superior lifetime outcomes.

TOCA has built a reputation for excellence in Arizona for more than 65 years as the first and foremost orthopedic group. Our Nationally and Internationally recognized orthopedic physicians and surgeons utilize the most advanced proven technologies for the best recovery possible to return you to your active lifestyle.

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To learn more about TOCA’s physicians read more Here. For more information on TOCA’s history read more Here. To contact TOCA find more information by clicking Here

#Recovery #Results #Relief #MyOrthoDoc #TOCA #TOCAMD #JohnKinna #NewCEO

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Total Elbow Replacement: What you need to know

Total Elbow Replacement

The elbow is a necessary joint for normal functioning in daily life, yet it is susceptible to various degenerative conditions and traumatic lesions or posttraumatic sequelae.  Although a total elbow replacement is much less common than knee or hip replacement, it is just as successful in relieving joint pain and returning people to activities they enjoy.

Elbow replacement surgery is a complicated procedure partly because the elbow has several moving parts that balance each other with great precision to control the movements of your forearm.

Your elbow can be damaged by problems ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to traumatic fractures. In some cases, the damage can be surgically repaired. But if the damage is extensive, your doctor might recommend elbow replacement surgery. Pain is the most common reason people choose to have elbow replacement surgery.

Over 3,000 people in the U.S. have elbow replacement surgery annually, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Whether you have just started exploring treatment options or have  decided to have an elbow replacement surgery, this article will help you understand more about this valuable procedure.

Anatomy

The elbow is a hinge joint which is made up of three bones:

  • The humerus (upper arm bone)
  • The ulna (forearm bone on the pinky finger side)
  • The radius (forearm bone on the thumb side)

The surfaces of the bones where they meet to form the elbow joint are covered with articular cartilage, a smooth substance that protects the bones and enables them to move easily. A thin, smooth tissue called synovial membrane covers all remaining surfaces inside the elbow joint. In a healthy elbow, this membrane makes a small amount of fluid that lubricates the cartilage and eliminates almost any friction as you bend and rotate your arm.

 

Muscles, ligaments, and tendons hold the elbow joint together.

 

(The main structures of the elbow when viewed from the side.)

Types of elbow replacement

In some cases, you may need a replacement of just one portion of the joint. For example, if only the head of one of your forearm bones (radius) is damaged, it can be replaced with an artificial head.

If the entire joint needs to be replaced, the ends of the bones that come together in the elbow will be removed. Bones are hard tubes that contain a soft center. The long, slender ends of the artificial joint are inserted into the softer central part of the bones.

There are two main types of prosthetic devices available:

  • Linked. This type of prosthesis acts somewhat like a loose hinge because all the parts of the replacement joint are connected. This provides good joint stability, but the stresses of movement can sometimes result in the prosthesis working itself loose from where it’s inserted into the arm bones.
  • Unlinked. This type of device comes in two separate pieces that aren’t connected to each other. This design depends on the surrounding ligaments to help hold the joint together, which can make it more prone to dislocation.

Description

In total elbow replacement surgery, the damaged parts of the humerus and ulna are replaced with artificial components. The artificial elbow joint is made up of a metal and plastic hinge with two metal stems. The stems fit inside the hollow part of the bone called the canal.

(Total elbow replacement components.)

There are different types of elbow replacements, and components come in different sizes. There are also partial elbow replacements, which may be used in very specific situations. A discussion with your doctor will help to determine what type of elbow replacement is best for you.

 

Causes

Several conditions can cause elbow pain and disability, and lead patients and their doctors to consider elbow joint replacement surgery.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

This is a disease in which the synovial membrane that surrounds the joint becomes inflamed and thickened. This chronic inflammation can damage the cartilage and eventually cause cartilage loss, pain, and stiffness.

Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common form of a group of disorders termed “inflammatory arthritis.”

Osteoarthritis (Degenerative Joint Disease)

Osteoarthritis is an age-related, “wear and tear” type of arthritis. It usually occurs in people 50 years of age and older, but may occur in younger people, too. The cartilage that cushions the bones of the elbow softens and wears away. The bones then rub against one another. Over time, the elbow joint becomes stiff and painful.

Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis cause cartilage damage that can result in severe pain and disability.

Post-traumatic Arthritis

This type of arthritis can follow a serious elbow injury. Fractures of the bones that make up the elbow, or tears of the surrounding tendons and ligaments may cause damage to the articular cartilage over time. This causes pain and limits elbow function.

Severe Fractures

A severe fracture of one or more bones that make up the elbow is another common reason people have elbow replacements. If the elbow is shattered, it may be very difficult for a doctor to put the pieces of bone back in place. In addition, the blood supply to the bone pieces can be interrupted. In this type of case, a surgeon may recommend an elbow replacement. Older patients with osteoporosis (fragile bone) are most at risk for severe elbow fractures.

In addition, some fractures do not heal well and may require an elbow replacement to address continuing problems.

Instability

Instability occurs when the ligaments that hold the elbow joint together are damaged and do not work well. The elbow is prone to dislocation. Chronic instability is most often caused by an injury.

 

Teamwork

TOCA’s treatment teams include specialists in orthopedic surgery and in physical medicine and rehabilitation. These experts work together with the goal of restoring strength and range of motion in your elbow.

 

Diagnostic and surgical innovation

TOCA’s physicians  have developed several diagnostic examinations and surgical techniques to help make elbow replacement a highly effective treatment option.

Table. Treatment Options for Elbow-Related Problems

Affected joint(s) Options Plain radiographs
Radial head Radial head replacement Figure 1
Ulna Total elbow arthroplasty Figure 2
Humeroradial Radial head replacement Figure 1
Unicompartmental replacement Figure 3
Humeroulnar Total elbow arthroplasty Figure 2
Humerus Hemiarthroplasty Figure 4
Radioulnar Radial head replacement Figure 1
Radial head resection

Preparing for Surgery

Medical Evaluation

If you decide to have elbow replacement surgery, your orthopaedic surgeon at TOCA may ask you to schedule a complete physical examination with your family physician several weeks before surgery. This is needed to make sure you are healthy enough to have the surgery and complete the recovery process.

Many patients with chronic medical conditions, like heart disease, must also be evaluated by a specialist, such a cardiologist, before the surgery.

Medications

Be sure to talk to your orthopaedic surgeon and TOCA medical team about the medications you take. Some medications may need to be stopped before surgery. For example, the following over-the-counter medicines may cause excessive bleeding and should be stopped 2 weeks before surgery:

  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen sodium
  • Most arthritis medications

If you take blood thinners, either your primary care doctor or cardiologist will advise you about stopping these medications before surgery.

Home Planning

Making simple changes in your home before surgery can make your recovery period easier.

For the first several weeks after your surgery, it will be hard to reach high shelves and cupboards. Before your surgery, be sure to go through your home and place any items you may need afterwards on low shelves.

When you come home from the hospital, you will need help for a few weeks with some daily tasks like dressing, bathing, cooking, and laundry. If you will not have any support at home immediately after surgery, you may need a short stay in a rehabilitation facility until you become more independent.

 

Your Surgery

Before Your Operation

You will most likely be admitted to the hospital on the day of your surgery. After admission, you will be taken to the preoperative preparation area and will meet a doctor from the anesthesia department.

You, your anesthesiologist, and your surgeon will discuss the type of anesthesia to be used. In most total elbow replacement surgeries, a general anesthetic that puts you to sleep for the entire operation is used.

Surgical Procedure

To reach the elbow joint, your surgeon will make an incision (cut), usually at the back of the elbow. After making the incision, your surgeon will gently move muscles aside to get access to the bone. After removing scar tissue and spurs around the joint, your surgeon will prepare the humerus to fit the metallic piece that will replace that side of the joint. The same preparation is done for the ulna.

The replacement stems are placed into the humerus and ulna bones, and kept in place with a bone cement. The two stems are connected by a hinge pin. After the wound is closed, a padded dressing is then placed to protect the incision while it heals.

Some surgeons will place a temporary tube in the joint to drain the surgical fluid. This tube can be easily removed in your hospital room within the first few days after surgery.

 

Implants

The metal replacement parts are made of chrome-cobalt alloy or titanium and there is a liner made of polyethylene (plastic). The bone cement is made of polymethylmethacrylate (acrylic, a type of plastic).

Recovery

Your medical team will give you several doses of antibiotics to prevent infection. Most patients are able to eat solid food and get out of bed the day after surgery. You will most likely stay at the hospital 2 to 4 days after your surgery.

Pain Management

After surgery, you will feel some pain, but your surgeon and nurses will provide medication to make you feel as comfortable as possible. Talk with your surgeon if postoperative pain becomes a problem.

Rehabilitation

A careful, well-planned rehabilitation program is critical to the success of an elbow replacement. You will be taught some exercises for your hand and wrist to avoid stiffness and help to control swelling. You will do gentle elbow range-of-motion exercises as the incision heals. Your doctor may prescribe therapy or may teach you how to do the exercises yourself.

You will most likely not be allowed to put any weight on your arm or push against resistance with your hand until about 6 weeks after your surgery.

Long-Term Outcomes

The majority of patients have experienced an improved quality of life after total elbow replacement surgery. They experience less pain, improved motion and strength, and better function.

You should expect to do all basic activities of daily living, such as getting a plate out of a cabinet, cooking dinner, lifting a milk jug, styling your hair, basic hygiene, and dressing. Talk to your doctor about activities you may want to avoid, such as contact sports and activities with a major risk of falling (such as horseback riding or climbing ladders), as well as heavy lifting. These things increase the risk of the metal parts loosening or breaking, or the bone breaking.

When traveling on airplanes, be prepared for extra security screening. There is a chance that your metal implant will set off the metal detector during the security check-in.

To make the check-in go more smoothly, tell the security officer beforehand that you have an elbow replacement and carry a medical identification card. Although this does not change the screening requirements, it will help the security officer confirm the nature of the alarm. Be prepared for the security officer to use a wand scanner, and perhaps examine your arm in a private area in order to see the scar. The new body scanners can identify joint replacements, making further individual screening unnecessary.

 

If you are experiencing pain from an elbow injury or chronic condition schedule an appointment with an Orthopedic Specialist at TOCA by calling 602-277-6211!

 

#Recovery #Results #Relief #MyOrthoDoc #ElbowSurgery #ElbowPain #TOCA #TOCAMD

Congratulations Dr. Christopher Huston!

Congratulations Dr. Christopher Huston! Dr. Huston was recently named Top Doctor in the Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation category by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. for 2017!

Dr. Huston is an expert in Interventional Spine, Neck & Back issues, Spine complications & Electrodiagnostics at TOCA.

Dr. Christopher W. Huston is fellowship-trained in the diagnosis, rehabilitation and utilization of interventional spine procedures for the treatment of painful spine disorders. He reviews for various medical journals, which has included the Archives of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationJournal of Physical Medicine, and Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine.

Dr. Huston has served on several award, planning, and spine committees for the Physiatric Association of Spine, Sports & Occupational Rehabilitation. Additionally, he served as assistant chief of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center for the U.S. Army in Washington, D.C.

He has published various scientific abstracts, manuscripts, articles, and book chapters for various physical medicine, rehabilitation and spine disorder publications regarding spine disorders and interventions. Dr. Huston is regularly asked to present on those topics across North America. He is the TOCA Interventional Spine Fellowship Director. Physicians from across the country apply for the TOCA Interventional Spine Fellowship to work with Dr. Huston.

Castle Connel Medical LTD

Since 1991 Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. has been dedicated to helping consumers find the best healthcare in America. Along with the “Top Doctor” book series we publish, including our most popular volume to-date, America’s Top Doctors®, our website enables visitors to easily search for doctors by specialty, location or name. We also offer a “Top Hospital” search for patients in need of guidance on where to go for expert, local medical care.

The company was founded by two respected leaders in healthcare, John K. Castle and John J. Connolly, Ed.D. Dr. Connolly was the President of New York Medical College for more than ten years. Mr. Castle served for six years as a commissioner and executive officer of the Joint Commission (formerly JCAHO); he also served as Chairman of the Board of New York Medical College for eleven years and served on its Board for twenty-two years.

How Castle Connolly Identifies Top Doctors

At Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. we identify top doctors, both nationally and regionally, based on an extensive nominations process open to ALL licensed physicians in America. The Castle Connolly physician-led research team reviews and screens all nominated physicians before selecting those regarded as the most outstanding healthcare providers to be Top Doctors. Physicians do not and cannot pay to be selected as a Castle Connolly Top Doctor.

To read more about Dr. Huston visit: www.tocamd.com

For more information about Castle Connolly Medical please visit: https://www.castleconnolly.com

 

#Recovery #Results #Relief #MyOrthoDoc #TOCA #TOCAMD #TopDoc

7 Safety Tips for an Injury-Free Labor Day

Labor Day is synonymous with the end of summer, and the long holiday weekend is upon us. Labor Day is typically packed with celebratory events like backyard barbecues, final excursions to the lake, picnics at the park, and beach parties. But even festive events like these present hazards you should be aware of.

Whether you’re planning a final summer outing or staying home to wrap up summer chores, we want you and your family to enjoy a safe close to the season. To help you do so, we’ve gathered these helpful Labor Day weekend safety tips.

1. Road-trip, anyone?

If you’re planning a weekend excursion make sure you’re well rested, plan for frequent rest stops, and divide driving duties if possible. You should also have your car checked by a registered mechanic to avoid a break down on the road. Don’t forget to pack a vehicle emergency kit that contains items like a flashlight, jumper cables, a tool kit, tire gauge and flares.

Tips for Safe Travel

  • Carry an emergency supply kit in your trunk.
  • Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive.
  • Buckle up and observe speed limits.
  • Don’t drink and drive.

 

2. Festive Fireworks

fireworks1They are fun, flashy and festive, but many of us overlook the injury fireworks can cause. The National Safety Council reports that children 10 to 14 years of age are at three times the risk of being injured by fireworks than the population as a whole. Even sparklers can inflict serious injury. If you choose to use fireworks be sure you only light one at a time, maintain the recommended distance from spectators, and never allow any horseplay while fireworks are being set up or ignited. If a firework malfunctions, don’t re-light it. Above all, never allow young children handle fireworks and never use fireworks while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

3. Alcohol in Moderation

Alcohol and parties often go hand in hand, but beware that drinking impacts your decision making, coordination, reaction time and vision which makes you vulnerable to a number of hazards. If you plan on consuming alcohol, setting a limit on how much you will consume. And the time to set your limit is before you arrive at the neighborhood cookout. Once you set an alcohol limit, stick to it. Drink one glass of water in between alcoholic drinks to help keep hydrated and pace your alcohol consumption. If you drink more than you planned, ask for help getting home. And keep in mind that operating a motor vehicle after just a drink or two is dangerous.

4. Boating Safety

wakeboardingBoating is a quintessential Labor Day event. Make sure you keep it safe by ensuring the boat is in good mechanical condition, and carries all safety equipment including personal flotation devices, an emergency kit and a first aid kit. Keep away from restricted areas, be sure that you’re familiar with the rules of the water, and tell someone on land where you’re heading and what time you expect to return. For more boating safety tips, read “7 Tips for Avoiding Danger on a Boat.”

Tips for Safe Swimming

  • Check weather and water conditions beforehand and throughout the day.
  • Always swim with a buddy in a designated swimming area supervised by a lifeguard.
  • Provide constant supervision to children in or near the water and always stay within arm’s reach of young children and inexperienced swimmers while they are in the water.
  • Young children and inexperienced swimmers should wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets.

5. Conquering Outdoor Chores

Lots of us look forward to relaxing on Labor Day weekend, but if you’re tackling outdoor chores instead, we hope you’ll keep these safety tips in mind. Before you use any power tool make sure the cord isn’t frayed, that it is free of cuts and appears to be in good condition. If you need an extension cord be sure it is designed for outdoor use. Additionally, be sure that the extension cord’s amperage can handle the demand of the power tool you’re using. Cleaning gutters, trimming trees and painting are just a few common outdoor chores that require a ladder, and ladders are notoriously dangerous. Only use a ladder when there’s someone else at home and if you’re using a metal ladder be careful that it does not come into contact with an electrical source.

6. Prevent Food-borne Illnesses

grilling
What’s a Labor Day holiday without lots of food? Picnics, barbeques, and neighborhood pot-lucks are plentiful and that means so is the chance of food-borne illness. To minimize the chance of cross-contamination, wash your hands before and after you touch raw meat. Dry your hands on paper towels instead of cloth towels, and discard immediately. Refrigerate meat that’s waiting to hit the grill. Never leave food that requires refrigeration (think potato salad, coleslaw or chicken salad) out in the sun. Instead, set the item the bowl is in on top of a pan filled with ice, and serve from a shaded area. Return the item to the refrigerator as soon as party-goers have been served.

Tips for Safe Grilling

  • Keep the grill away from the house, tree branches, or anything that could catch fire.
  • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill.
  • Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals have already been ignited.

 

7. Hydration and sun protection

Soda and juice might be a bit tastier, but you should hydrate your body with water instead. If you’re having a party, set out a few tubs full of bottled water and encourage your guests to drink small amounts often. Remember the golden rule: If your urine is yellow, you’re not drinking enough water.

It’s the end of summer, but in many parts of the country the sun is still raging. Apply sunscreen before you head out in the sun and reapply as necessary. Remember that the elderly and the young have especially sensitive skin and don’t forget that some medications can increase your skin’s sensitivity to the sun.

Whether you’re splashing in a pool, enjoying the ultimate picnic or knocking out those household chores, we want you to stay safe this Labor Day weekend. Remember: An accident is never planned. But keeping out safety tips in mind may help prevent one.

 

The American Red Cross First Aid App for smart phones and tablets provides users with expert advice on what to do in case of an emergency. This free app is available on the Apple iTunes or Google Play stores and at redcross.org/mobileapps.

The Team at TOCA wish you and your family health and happiness as we celebrate this Labor Day.

To learn more about TOCA, our Physician Team, or to schedule an appointment call our dedicated TOCA Team at: 602-277-6211!

 

If you enjoyed this article you may also be interested in reading: 10 Common Summer Injuries, Arizona Hiking Tips, Protecting Yourself from Dehydration and Fishing Safety & Boating

#Injuryprevention #Recovery #Results #Relief #MyOrthoDoc #TOCA #TOCAMD #LaborDay

Support Houston and Hurricane Harvey Relief

Relief efforts for those affected by Hurricane Harvey are underway, even as the storm continues to wreak havoc in Texas. A large and complicated rescue operation is underway in Houston as floodwaters continue to rise, fed by unrelenting rain.

So far, there’s no end in sight.

More than 2 feet of rain have already fallen in Houston, and the city may see another 2 feet in the next few days, Business Insider reported. Texans were about halfway through the worst of the storm on Monday, but devastating flooding is likely to continue. Tens of thousands of people could be driven from their homes as a result.

Americans wanting to pitch in from afar can donate to organizations such as the Red Cross that are providing disaster assistance to victims affected by Harvey, which made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane but has been downgraded to a tropical storm.

Average of 91 Cents of Every Dollar Spent Invested in Humanitarian Services and Programs

The American Red Cross is accepting donations on its website. You can also text HARVEY to 90999 to donate $10.

Read more

NUsurface Meniscus Surgery: Are You a Candidate?

NUsurface Meniscus Surgery: Are You a Candidate?

Your Life Arizona talks with orthopedic surgeon Dr. Tom Carter and NUsurface Meniscus Implant recipient Robert Nowlan about a clinical trial for knee pain after meniscus surgery. For more information on the trial, please call (844) 680-8951.

Have you had surgery to repair a torn meniscus but are still living with knee pain? Have you been told that you’re too young for knee replacement surgery and thought you were out of options? If you answered yes to these questions, you may be a candidate for the NUsurface Meniscus Implant – a medial meniscus replacement to treat persistent knee pain caused by injured or deteriorating meniscus cartilage.

The implant, which is made of medical grade plastic and inserted in to the knee through a small incision, has been used in Europe since 2008 and Israel since 2011. A clinical trial called SUN (Safety Using NUsurface®) is taking place at TOCA (The Orthopedic Clinic Association) to determine the effectiveness of the NUsurface Meniscus Implant for individuals with knee pain. More information about this study can be found here.

While it’s not meant to take the place of a total knee replacement, the NUsurface Meniscus Implant can serve as an opportunity to treat knee pain and keep you active until knee replacement surgery, if needed, is a viable option. The unique materials and composite structure are designed to mimic the function of a natural meniscus and redistribute loads transmitted across the knee joint. To date, the implant has given nearly 100 patients a second chance at a pain-free, active life.

About the Procedure

The meniscus implant is inserted into the knee through a small incision, and patients are allowed to go home the same day or the day after the operation. After surgery, they undergo a six-week rehabilitation program and a physician will explain recommended activities during this period.

Who is Eligible?

If you’re interested in the NUsurface Meniscus Implant, ask yourself the following questions to determine if you might be eligible to participate in this clinical trial:

  • Have you had a previous medial partial meniscectomy that was performed at least six months ago?
  • Do you have persistent knee pain?
  • Has your physician recommended non-surgical therapies to deal with the pain?
  • Are you between the ages of 30 and 75?

Please note patients who are candidates for partial or total knee arthroplasty are not eligible.

How Can I Find Out if I Qualify?

Visit sun-trial.com, call (844) 680-8951 or contact the dedicated TOCA Team at 602-277-6211

Learn more about Dr. Carter Here

TOCA (The Orthopedic Clinic Association) performs the first meniscus replacement in Arizona read more Here

 

#MyOrthoDoc #TOCAMD #TOCA #YourLifeAtoZ #ActiveImplants #MeniscusReplacement