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Congratulations Dr. Evan Lederman!

Congratulations Dr. Evan Lederman (Arthroscopic Surgery, Sports Medicine, Shoulder & Knee Reconstruction Orthopedic Physician and Surgeon at TOCA)! Dr. Lederman has been invited as a speaker to the 2017 Current Concepts in Joint Replacement (CCJR). The 18th annual course is held in Las Vegas, Nevada annually in May. The CCJR meeting is one of the largest joint replacement in the US with over 1,000 attendees.

Dr. Lederman will be speaking on topics such as “Controversies in Shoulder Reconstruction”, “Preventing Infection in Shoulder Arthroplasty: Navigating the Minefields”, “What would YOU do? Challenges in Shoulder Surgery” and “Tips, Tidbits & Surgical Pearls: Critical Keys to Success in Shoulder Arthroplasty – Humeral Cemented Revision: Techniques for Safe Extraction”.

To learn more about Dr. Lederman or to schedule an appointment visit www.tocamd.com or call 602-277-6211!

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The course is open to orthopaedic surgeons, residents, nurses, and members of the orthopaedic and allied health industries.

• This meeting will focus on both primary and revision outcomes, surgical approaches, new materials and design as well as address problems of articulation choice, fixation, bone deficiency, instability, trauma, and infection for hip, knee, and shoulder replacement.

• Topics delve into a triad of design, patient factors and technical proficiency responsible for achieving clinical longevity in hip, knee, and shoulder reconstruction.

• Hemi and total shoulder arthroplasty topics focus on improved instrumentation, design modularity, evolving surgical techniques, and optimal patient outcomes.

• An assemblage of contemporary thought leaders will probe the boundaries of these problems and offer solutions for joint pathologies where arthroplasty is indicated.

• An assemblage of contemporary thought leaders will probe the boundaries of these problems and offer solutions for joint pathologies where arthroplasty is indicated.

• Plenary commentary, didactic clinical reports, technique videos, debate, case challenges, and live surgery define the formats of presentation, which provide an optimal learning opportunity for orthopaedic surgeons and other allied professionals involved in joint reconstruction.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

As a result of attending this symposium, the participant will be able to:

• Appraise evolving surgical techniques and implant technologies through didactic and interactive live presentation as well as evaluate early and long-term clinical outcomes.

• Identify problems and concerns relevant to hip, knee, and shoulder arthroplasty including polyethylene wear, short and long term tissue response, inter-component failure, and peri-prosthetic fracture.

• Discuss optimal clinical application of current and evolving fixation techniques in primary and revision procedures including cement, hydroxyapatite, porous coating, press fit, impaction grafting, and evolving porous metal technologies

• Appreciate current solution options for hip, knee and shoulder arthroplasty failure where revision is an endpoint and understand the contributory roles of bone loss, soft tissue deficiency, and infection.

ACCREDITATION STATEMENT

The Current Concepts Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

#Recovery #Results #Relief #JointReplacement #Orthopedics#Sportsmedicine

Shoulder Pain: When to Worry

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Shoulder Pain: When to Worry! The shoulder is the most mobile joint in the body and because of its extensive range of motion it’s susceptible to injury and pain. While the shoulder is not thought of as a weight bearing joint, once you lift an object or roll over at night, the forces going through the shoulder joint exceed those of most joints due to the long lever arm of the outstretched arm. The shoulder can hurt after it has been injured or for no apparent reason. Most shoulder problems are relatively short-lived but sometimes the pain is indicative of a more complex issue.

No worries:

Slight pain with elevation and when playing overhead sports is common. The four tendons that make up the rotator cuff and the biceps tendon, (the combined musculature that drives the shoulder motions) can be inflamed by activities such as throwing, shooting basketballs, and lifting bags over head. The tendons are covered by a thin layer called a bursa, which swells when irritated. The bursitis is filled with inflammatory components that irritate the nerve fibers sending pain signals to the brain. Eliminating the overhead activities and mild use of anti-inflammatories usually cures the mild bursitis, or tendonitis, and solves the problem. Exercises to strengthen posture are also commonly used by our physical therapists to fix mild shoulder irritations. Slumping at your desk, reaching for your mouse, hunching over your keyboard, can all put extra strain on the shoulder, neck or back and may be the cause of your shoulder pain. Stand with your shoulders at or behind your hips with your belly button tucked in and notice the difference.

More worry:

Pain that does not go away or pain that occurs with every activity indicates that the key tissues are irritated enough that they are sending pain signals even without motion. This degree of inflammation precedes more structural injuries such as tears of the tissue or early arthritis. Treated fully, the tears and the arthritis can be prevented.

Real worry:

Pain at night or pain not improving with therapy after 4 weeks are red flags. Pain radiating down the arm or up to the neck or to the back are also worrisome for injuries not just in the shoulder but sometimes of the neck. These injuries need to be worked up with careful physical exams, x-rays and MRIs. A full tear of the rotator cuff often will present with night pain, since when you roll over you push the arm up into the socket through the rotator cuff tear. Pain radiating down the arm or up to the neck can sometimes be from the discs in the neck or the nerves at the front of the shoulder called the brachial plexus. Instability of the shoulder, with the shoulder popping in or out of the joint is another area that is best treated with early repair of the torn ligaments.

Fortunately most of the torn tissue problems in the shoulder can be repaired under a local block with an arthroscope as an outpatient procedure. The key is to treat them early before full tearing of tissues leads to disability.

Are you experiencing shoulder pain?

To speak to a Shoulder Specialist at TOCA call: 602-277-6211 or visit our shoulder specialty page to learn more.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]