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Congratulations to Dr. Evan Lederman for his recent publication!

Title: The Evolution of the Superior Capsular Reconstruction Technique

Alan M. Hirahara, MD, FRCSC; Evan S. Lederman, MD; Wyatt J. Andersen, ATC; and Kyle Yamashiro, PT, DPT, CSCS

Introduction

Irreparable, massive rotator cuff tears can result in unacceptable functional deficits in patients. When the supraspinatus tears and retracts medially, the superior capsule is also disrupted, and superior constraint is lost. With no superior restraint to the humerus, the humeral head migrates superiorly, causing a decrease in the acromial-humeral distance. [1-4]

Biomechanical analysis has shown that a defect in the superior capsule results in a minimum 200% greater glenohumeral superior translation and subacromial peak contact pressure compared with an intact capsule. [3] The malposition of the humeral head leads to functional abnormalities and pseudoparalysis.

Numerous proposed treatments for massive rotator cuff tears – including debridement and tenotomy, tendon transfers, and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty – have yielded mixed results and high complication rates. [5-12] In particular, reverse shoulder arthroplasty can result in humeral or glenoid fractures, persistent anterior or posterior instabilities, loosening of the glenoid or humeral cemented components, dislocations, and infection. [5-7]

The superior capsular reconstruction (SCR) was described by Hanada et al [13] in 1993 and by Mihata et al [1] in 2013 as an alternative procedure to increase function and decrease pain by restoring the restraint mechanisms in the shoulder. Using a graft to recreate the superior capsule, the humeral head is centered in the glenoid, allowing the larger muscles (ie, deltoid, latissimus dorsi, and pectoralis major) to function appropriately. Mihata et al [3,4] have found that the SCR reduces glenohumeral superior translation and subacromial contact force.

Full article link below.

ICJR.net  March 2018

Rotator Cuff Tear: What you need to know

Rotator Cuff Tear: What you need to know

Rotator Cuff Tear: The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that surround the shoulder joint, keeping the head of your upper arm bone firmly within the shallow socket of the shoulder. A rotator cuff injury can cause a dull ache in the shoulder, which often worsens when you try to sleep on the involved side.

Rotator cuff injuries

Rotator cuff injuries can range in severity from simple inflammation to complete tears.

What Is a Rotator Cuff Tear?

A rotator cuff tear is a common injury, especially in sports like baseball or tennis, or in jobs like painting or cleaning windows. It usually happens over time from normal wear and tear, or if you repeat the same arm motion over and over. But it also can happen suddenly if you fall on your arm or lift something heavy.

Your rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and tendons that stabilize your shoulder joint and let you lift and rotate your arms.

There are two kinds of rotator cuff tears. A partial tear is when the tendon that protects the top of your shoulder is frayed or damaged. The other is a complete tear. That’s one that goes all the way through the tendon or pulls the tendon off the bone.

Symptoms
You can’t always feel a torn rotator cuff. But in some cases, you might:

  • Have trouble raising your arm
  • Feel pain when you move your arm in certain ways or lie on it
  • Have weakness in your shoulder
  • Be unable to lift things like you normally do
  • Hear clicking or popping when you move your arm

See your doctor if you have any of these signs. If you don’t do anything about a torn rotator cuff, you can have more serious problems over time. You can end up with a frozen shoulder or arthritis that is harder to treat.

Diagnosis

To find out if you have a torn rotator cuff, your doctor will start with a history of the injury and a physical examination of the shoulder. During the exam, he’ll check your range of motion and muscle strength. He’ll also see what movements make your shoulder hurt.

In addition, your doctor may use one of the following:

  • MRI This uses radio waves and a powerful magnet to make detailed pictures of your shoulder.
  • X-rays to see if the top of your arm bone (humeral head) is pushing into your rotator cuff space.
  • Ultrasound to see the soft tissues (tendons and muscles and the bursas) in your shoulder.

Treatment

Your doctor is likely to start with a combination of physical therapy to make your shoulder muscles stronger, and medications like acetaminophen and anti-inflammatory drugs to help with pain and swelling. Surgery may be required in some cases.
You also may get exercises to do at home and suggestions that help you use your shoulder in safer, more comfortable ways in your day-to-day life.

If those don’t work, you may need surgery, especially if you have a complete tear. It’s likely your doctor will need to stitch together the torn area or reattach the tendon to the bone.

In some cases, he might need to take out small pieces of tendon or bone that are stuck in your shoulder joint or remove small areas of bone or tissue to give your tendon more room to move.

There are three types of rotator cuff surgery:

  • Arthroscopic: Your doctor will make a small cut in your shoulder then use an arthroscope — a tube with a small camera and tiny instruments — to fix the tear. This means your recovery time will likely be shorter than it would with another type of surgery.
  • Open: Your doctor uses larger instruments to go in to the muscles of your shoulder and fix the tear.
  • Mini-Open: This uses both arthroscopic and open methods. Your doctor starts with the arthroscope and finishes with larger instruments.

Recovery
After surgery, you’ll wear a sling for 4 to 6 weeks. Your doctor probably will tell you to do the following to speed along your recovery:

  • Take the sling off several times a day and move your elbow, wrist, and hand to get better blood flow in those areas.
  • If you have pain and swelling in your shoulder, use an ice pack for about 20 minutes at a time.
    Most important: Do not lift your arm at the shoulder until your doctor says it’s OK.
    How your recovery goes will depend a lot on the size of the tear and how long your rotator cuff was torn. The smaller and more recent the tear, the better your chances of being pain-free and having a full range of motion.

Be patient. Recovery is a gradual process. It can take up to a year for you to have full use of your shoulder again.

If you are experiencing a shoulder, sports medicine/orthopedic pain or a sports injury, the team of Physicians here at TOCA are here to help! To view more information about the shoulder/ upper extremity and all of our shoulder physicians click here. If you have questions or to request an appointment call 602-277-6211.

For more articles about shoulders you may be interested in: Shoulder Injury Prevention Tips,  Shoulder surgery, Shoulder Pain: When to Worry,

#InjuryPrevention #Injury #Knee #ACL #shoulderpain #Pain #SportsMedicine #SportsInjury #Results #Recovery #Relief #TOCA #TOCAMD #shoulderinjury #rotatorcuffsurgery #MyOrthoDoc

Shoulder Surgery

Shoulder Surgery

The shoulders are among the most important joints in the human body. Unfortunately, as we age our shoulders can wear out plus they may be subject to debilitating conditions such as arthritis, disease, or other injuries.

Your shoulder is the most flexible joint in your body. It allows you to place and rotate your arm in many positions in front, above, to the side, and behind your body. This flexibility also makes your shoulder susceptible to instability and injury.

Depending on the nature of the problem, nonsurgical methods of treatment often are recommended before surgery. However, in some instances, delaying the surgical repair of a shoulder can increase the likelihood that the problem will be more difficult to treat later. Early, correct diagnosis and treatment of shoulder problems can make a significant difference in the long run.

How the Normal Shoulder Works

(Anatomy of the shoulder joint)

The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint. It is made up of three bones: the upper arm bone (humerus), shoulder blade (scapula) and collarbone (clavicle).

The ball at the top end of the arm bone fits into the small socket (glenoid) of the shoulder blade to form the shoulder joint (glenohumeral joint).

The socket of the glenoid is surrounded by a soft-tissue rim (labrum).

A smooth, durable surface (articular cartilage) on the head of the arm bone, and a thin inner lining (synovium) of the joint allows the smooth motion of the shoulder joint.

The upper part of the shoulder blade (acromion) projects over the shoulder joint. One end of the collarbone is joined with the shoulder blade by the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. The other end of the collarbone is joined with the breastbone (sternum) by the sternoclavicular joint.

The joint capsule is a thin sheet of fibers that surrounds the shoulder joint. The capsule allows a wide range of motion, yet provides stability.

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that attach your upper arm to your shoulder blade. The rotator cuff covers the shoulder joint and joint capsule.

The muscles attached to the rotator cuff enable you to lift your arm, reach overhead, and take part in activities such as throwing or swimming.

A sac-like membrane (bursa) between the rotator cuff and the shoulder blade cushions and helps lubricate the motion between these two structures.

 

Shoulder Problems and Treatments

Bursitis or Tendinitis

Bursitis or tendinitis can occur with overuse from repetitive activities, such as swimming, painting, or weight lifting. These activities cause rubbing or squeezing (impingement) of the rotator cuff under the acromion and in the acromioclavicular joint. Initially, these problems are treated by modifying the activity which causes the symptoms of pain and with a rehabilitation program for the shoulder.

Impingement and Partial Rotator Cuff Tears

Partial thickness rotator cuff tears can be associated with chronic inflammation and the development of spurs on the underside of the acromion or the acromioclavicular joint.

The conservative nonsurgical treatment is modification of activity, light exercise, and, occasionally, a cortisone injection. Nonsurgical treatment is successful in a majority of cases. If it is not successful, surgery often is needed to remove the spurs on the underside of the acromion and to repair the rotator cuff.

 

Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

Full-thickness rotator cuff tears are most often the result of impingement, partial thickness rotator cuff tears, heavy lifting, or falls. Nonsurgical treatment with modification of activity is successful in a majority of cases.

If pain continues, surgery may be needed to repair full- thickness rotator cuff tears. Arthroscopic techniques allow shaving of spurs, evaluation of the rotator cuff, and repair of some tears.

Both techniques require extensive rehabilitation to restore the function of the shoulder.

 

Instability of the Shoulder

Instability occurs when the head of the upper arm bone is forced out of the shoulder socket. This can happen as a result of sudden injury or from overuse of the shoulder ligaments.

The two basic forms of shoulder instability are subluxations and dislocations. A subluxation is a partial or incomplete dislocation. If the shoulder is partially out of the shoulder socket, it eventually may dislocate. Even a minor injury may push the arm bone out of its socket. A dislocation is when the head of the arm bone slips out of the shoulder socket. Some patients have chronic instability. Shoulder dislocations may occur repeatedly.

Patients with repeat dislocation usually require surgery. Open surgical repair may require a short stay in the hospital. Arthroscopic surgical repair is often done on an outpatient basis. Following either procedure, extensive rehabilitation, often including physical therapy, is necessary for healing.

 

Fractured Collarbone and Acromioclavicular Joint Separation

A fractured collarbone and acromioclavicular separation are common injuries of children and others who fall on the side of their shoulder when playing. Most of these injuries are treated nonsurgically with slings or splints. Severe displaced fractures or acromioclavicular joint separation may require surgical repair.

 

 

 

Fractured Head of the Humerus (Arm Bone), or Proximal Humerus Fracture

A fractured head of the humerus is a common result of falls on an outstretched arm, particularly by older people with osteoporosis. If fragmented or displaced, it may require open surgical repair and possibly replacement with an artificial joint (prosthesis).

 

 

 

 

Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis can destroy the shoulder joint and surrounding tissue. They can also cause degeneration and tearing of the capsule or the rotator cuff. Osteoarthritis occurs when the articular surface of the joint wears thin. Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with chronic inflammation of the synovium lining which can produce chemicals that eventually destroy the inner lining of the joint, including the articular surface.

 

 

 

Shoulder replacement

Shoulder replacement is recommended for patients with painful shoulders and limited motion. The treatment options are either replacement of the head of the bone or replacement of the entire socket. Your orthopaedic surgeon will discuss with you the best option.

 

 

Orthopaedic Evaluation

The orthopaedic evaluation of your shoulder consists of three components:

  • A medical history to gather information about current complaints; duration of symptoms, pain and limitations; injuries; and past treatment with medications or surgery.
  • A physical examination to assess swelling, tenderness, range of motion, strength or weakness, instability, and/or deformity of the shoulder.
  • Diagnostic tests, such as X-rays taken with the shoulder in various positions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be helpful in assessing soft tissues in the shoulder. Computed tomography (CT) scan may be used to evaluate the bony parts of the shoulder.

Your orthopaedic surgeon will review the results of your evaluation with you and discuss the best treatment. You and your doctor may agree that surgery is the best treatment option. He or she will explain the potential risks and complications that may occur. Your doctor may discuss donating your own blood to be used if needed during surgery.

Some surgical procedures require hospitalization for a number of days. Your doctor may discuss planning for the period after surgery. You may need to either stay in an extended care facility or have someone help you when you return home.

Preparing for Surgery

  • No food or drink after midnight before surgery.
  • Discuss with your doctor what to do about medications taken in the morning.
  • An hour before surgery, you will be assessed in the preoperative area by a nurse anesthetist or anesthesiologist.

Types of Surgical Procedures

You may be given the option to have an arthroscopic procedure or an open surgical procedure.

Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy allows the orthopaedic surgeon to insert a pencil-thin device with a small lens and lighting system into tiny incisions to look inside the joint. The images inside the joint are relayed to a TV monitor, allowing the doctor to make a diagnosis. Other surgical instruments can be inserted to make repairs, based on what is with the arthroscope. Arthroscopy often can be done on an outpatient basis. According to the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, more than 1.4 million shoulder arthroscopies are performed worldwide each year.

Open Surgery

Open surgery may be necessary and, in some cases, may be associated with better results than arthroscopy. Open surgery often can be done through small incisions of just a few inches.

Recovery and rehabilitation is related to the type of surgery performed inside the shoulder, rather than whether there was an arthroscopic or open surgical procedure.

Possible Complications After Surgery

There are always some risks with any surgery, even arthroscopic procedures. These include possible infection, and damage to surrounding nerves and blood vessels. However, modern surgical techniques and close monitoring have significantly minimized the occurrence of these problems.

After surgery, some pain, tenderness, and stiffness are normal. You should be alert for certain signs and symptoms that may suggest the development of complications.

  • Fever after the second day following surgery
  • Increasing pain or swelling
  • Redness, warmth, or tenderness which may suggest a wound infection
  • Unusual bleeding (some surgical wound drainage is normal and, in fact, desirable
  • Numbness or tingling of the arm or hand

Prevention of Future Problems

It is important that you continue a shoulder exercise program with daily stretching and strengthening. In general, patients who faithfully comply with the therapies and exercises prescribed by their orthopaedic surgeon and physical therapist will have the best medical outcome after surgery.

Your orthopaedic surgeon is a medical doctor with extensive training in the diagnosis and nonsurgical and surgical treatment of the musculoskeletal system, including bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, and nerves.

Using your shoulder after surgery

You had surgery on your shoulder to repair a muscle, tendon, or cartilage tear. The surgeon may have removed damaged tissue. You will need to know how to take care of your shoulder as it heals, and how to make it stronger.

What to Expect at Home

You will need to wear a sling when you leave the hospital. You may also need to wear a shoulder immobilizer. This keeps your shoulder from moving. How long you need to wear the sling or immobilizer depends on the type of surgery you had.

Follow your surgeon’s instructions for how to take care of your shoulder at home. Use the information below as a reminder.

Self-care

Wear the sling or immobilizer at all times, unless the surgeon says you do not have to.

  • It is ok to straighten your arm below your elbow and move your wrist and hand. But try to move your arm as little as possible.
  • Your arm should bend at a 90° angle (a right angle) at your elbow. The sling should support your wrist and hand so that they do not extend past the sling.
  • Move your fingers, hand, and wrist around 3 to 4 times during the day while they are in the sling. Each time, do this 10 to 15 times.
  • When the surgeon tells you to, begin taking your arm out of the sling and let it hang loosely by your side. Do this for longer periods each day.

If you wear a shoulder immobilizer, you can loosen it only at the wrist strap and straighten your arm at your elbow. Be careful not to move your shoulder when you do this. DO NOT take off the immobilizer all the way unless the surgeon tells you it is OK.

If you had rotator cuff surgery or other ligament or labral surgery, you need to be careful with your shoulder. Ask the surgeon what arm movements are safe to do.

  • DO NOT move your arm away from your body or over your head.
  • When you sleep, raise your upper body up on pillows. DO NOT lie flat. You can also try sleeping on a reclining chair.

You may also be told not to use your or hand on the side that had surgery. For example, DO NOT:

  • Lift anything with this arm or hand.
  • Lean on the arm or put any weight on it.
  • Bring objects toward your stomach by pulling in with this arm and hand.
  • Move or twist your elbow behind your body to reach for anything.

Your surgeon will refer you to a physical therapist to learn exercises for your shoulder. To learn more about TOCA’s Physical Therapy Team Click HERE

  • You will probably start with passive exercises. These are exercises the therapist will do with your arm. They help get the full movement back in your shoulder.
  • After that you will do exercises the therapist teaches you. These will help increase the strength in your shoulder and the muscles around your shoulder.

Consider making some changes around your home so it is easier for you to take care of yourself. Store everyday items you use in places you can reach easily. Keep things with you that you use a lot (such as your phone).

When to Call the Doctor

Call your surgeon or nurse if you have any of the following:

  • Bleeding that soaks through your dressing and does not stop when you place pressure over the area
  • Pain that does not go away when you take your pain medicine
  • Swelling in your arm
  • Your hand or fingers are darker in color or feel cool to the touch
  • Numbness or tingling in your fingers or hand
  • Redness, pain, swelling, or a yellowish discharge from any of the wounds
  • Fever of 101°F (38.3°C), or higher
  • Shortness of breath and chest pain

 

For questions about your shoulder pain or to schedule an appointment call the dedicated TOCA Team at: 602-451-4051!

For more articles and information about your shoulder consider reading more on our shoulder page and/or additional articles such as: Shoulder Pain: When to Worry and Shoulder Injury Prevention Tips

#Recovery #Results #Relief #MyOrthoDoc #TOCA #TOCAMD #shoulderpain #painfree #shouldersurgery

 

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org