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Dr. Blazuk and colleagues study the Validity of Indirect Ultrasound Findings…

Title: Validy of Indirect Ultrasound Findings in Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Ruptures

Ken Mautner, MD, Walter I. Sussman, DO, Katie Nanos, MD, Joseph Blazuk, MD, Carmen Brigham, ATC, Emily Sarros, ATC

Objectives: Ultrasound (US) is increasingly being used as an extension of the physical examination on the sidelines, in training rooms, and in clinics. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in sport is common, but the literature on US findings after acute ACL rupture is limited. Three indirect US findings of ACL rupture have been described, and this study assessed the validity of these indirect signs.

American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine /  J Ultrasound Med 2018; 9999:1-8 / 0278-4297

Click here for full article!

 

Dr Lederman, Dr Harmsen and colleagues review strategies to prevent infection in shoulder replacement. *

Title: Preventing infection in shoulder arthroplasty: Navigating the minefields

Abstract

Periprosthetic infection after shoulder arthroplasty represents a devastating complication that often requires extensive revision surgery with substantial economic and patient burden, and ultimately leads to reduced patient function.

Seminars in Arthroplasty

Volume 28, Issue 3, September 2017, Pages 145-149

https://doi.org/10.1053/j.sart.2017.12.006

*This is based on a lecture by Dr Lederman at the 2017 Current Concepts in Shoulder Arthroplasty conference in Las Vegas, NV.

Dr. Lederman, Dr. Lund and former fellows have described a new class of labral tears in the shoulder*

Title: The Glenoid Labral Articular Teardrop Lesion: A Chondrolabral Injury With Distinct Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

Evan S. Lederman MD, Stephen Flores MD, Christopher Stevens MD, Damien Richardson MD, Pamela Lund MD

*Identification of this lesion of MRI can help in diagnosis and treatment of labral tears.

Purpose

Evaluation and description of a pathognomonic lesion identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a chondrolabral injury of the glenohumeral joint.

Methods

Patients were prospectively identified at the time of MRI by a characteristic teardrop appearance of a pedicled displaced chondrolabral flap in the axillary recess on coronal imaging and retrospectively reviewed.

Full article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2017.08.236

Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery

Volume 34, Issue 2, February 2018, Pages 407-411

 

Dr. Lederman and colleagues discuss the outcome and safety of a short stem shoulder replacement

Title: Short-term clinical outcome of an anatomic short-stem humeral component in total shoulder arthroplasty

Anthony A. Romeo MD, Robert J Thorness MD, Shelby A Sumner MPH, Reuben Gobezie MD, Evan S Lederman MD, Patrick J Denard MD

Background

Short-stem press-fit humeral components have recently been developed in an effort to preserve bone in total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), but few studies have reported outcomes of these devices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term clinical outcomes of an anatomic short-stem humeral component in TSA. We hypothesized that the implant would lead to significant functional improvement with low rates of radiographic loosening.

Full Article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2017.05.026

The Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Volume 27, Issue 1, January 2018, Pages 70-74

Dr. Lederman and colleagues review how bone can react differently to shoulder replacements and document the potential benefit and safety of short stem shoulder implants

Title: Proximal Stress is Decreased with a Short Stem Compared to a Traditional Length Stem In Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

Patrick J. Denard MD, Matthew P Noyes MD, J B Walker, MD, Yousef Shishani, MD, Reuben Gobezie MD, Anthony A Romeo, MD, Evan S. Lederman, MD

Background

This study compared the outcome and radiographic humeral adaptations after placement of a traditional-length (TL) or short-stem (SS) humeral component during total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). The hypothesis was there would be no difference in outcome or radiographic adaptations.

Full article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2017.06.042

The Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Volume 27, Issue 1, January 2018, Pages 53-58

Dr. Lederman was a recent invited lecturer at the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons Annual Meeting 2018

 

Complex Shoulder Arthroplasty: Primary and Revision, Anatomic and Reverse, Three-Dimensional Planning – When and How? A case-based, comprehensive review of shoulder arthroplasty.

Moderator: Asheesh Bedi, MD: Panelists: Evan Lederman, Anthony Romeo, Gilles Walch, JP Warner, Brad Parsons, john Tokish, David Dines, Josh Dines, Michael Freehill, Xinning Li

New Orleans, LA – AAOS 2018 – American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) 2018 Annual meeting at the Ernest Morial Convention Center ,Tuesday March 6, 2018. With over 30,000 attendees, the conference is the preeminent meeting on musculoskeletal education to orthopaedic surgeons and allied health professionals in the world.

Celebrate Global Running Day 2017

Celebrate Global Running Day 2017

The world will be running on June 7. This is your invitation to join.

If you forgot to put it on the calendar, June 7 is Global Running Day. Over two million runners from across the globe, in 164 countries, have pledged to get up, get out, and go for a run. This is a great day to invite a non runner to take up the sport.

You’ve probably heard it said that exercise is medicine. Well, it’s not just a saying; it’s the truth. There’s a raft of scientific evidence that proves that regular exercise (150 minutes per week, which is about 30 minutes five times per week)—and running in particular—has health benefits that extend well beyond any pill a doctor could prescribe. Studies have shown that running can help prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, some cancers, and a host of other unpleasant conditions. What’s more, scientists have shown that running also vastly improves the quality of your emotional and mental life, and even helps you live longer.

A study out in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology finds that even five to 10 minutes a day of low-intensity running is enough to extend life by several years, compared with not running at all. It shows that the minimal healthy “dose” of exercise is smaller than many people might assume.

Benefits of Running That Make You Healthier (and Happier)

Everyone knows that running is a great way to get into shape, but did you know that it can benefit almost every part of your body, as well as lift your mood? Running is incredibly effective at making you healthier in a number of ways. While it may not be everybody’s favorite form of exercise, knowing what it can do for your life just may make you look at running in an entirely new light.

Improve Your Health

Believe it or not, running is actually a great way to increase your overall level of health. Research shows that running can raise your levels of good cholesterol while also helping you increase lung function and use. In addition, running can also boost your immune system and lower your risk of developing blood clots.

Running Is Good for Your Heart

Running is the king of cardio. Running even five to 10 minutes a day, at slow speeds (how does a nice 12-minute mile sound to you?) is associated with a drastically reduced risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, according to a landmark study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Compared with never-runners, regular runners have half the chance of dying from heart disease. Every time you run, you decrease your resting heart rate, so your heart doesn’t need to work as hard, says exercise physiologist Greg Justice, founder of AYC Health & Fitness in Kansas City.

Running Strengthens Your Joints and Increases bone density

A Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise study of nearly 100,000 runners and walkers found that, nope, running doesn’t up the risk of osteoarthritis—even people who cover 26.2 miles on the regular. In fact, the study showed runners were half as likely to suffer from knee osteoarthritis compared with walkers. Surprised? Every time you pound the pavement, you stress your bones and cartilage, just like your muscles, causing them to spring back stronger, explains Janet Hamilton, CSCS, an exercise physiologist with Running Strong in Atlanta. Low-impact exercises like walking, or even spinning or swimming, don’t have that same bone-building benefit. Running stresses your bones. Essential minerals are sent to the bones when under stress, which makes them stronger. However, running does not make you unbreakable, and jumping, say, a 10-foot high fence is still a bad idea.

Prevent Disease

For women, running can actually help to lower your risk of breast cancer. It can also help reduce the risk of having a stroke. Many doctors today recommend running for people who are in the early stages of diabetes, high blood pressure, and osteoporosis, and it is proven to help reduce the risk of having a heart attack. By helping the arteries retain their elasticity and strengthening the heart, your chances of suffering a heart attack can be significantly reduced.

Lose Weight

Running is one of the best forms of exercise for losing or maintaining a consistent weight. You will find that it is a leading way to burn off extra calories and that it is the second most effective exercise in terms of calories burned per minute, following only after cross country skiing.

Boost Your Confidence

Not all of the benefits of running are physical. Running can provide an noticeable boost to your confidence and self-esteem. By setting and achieving goals, you can help give yourself a greater sense of empowerment that will leave you feeling much happier.

Relieve Stress

Stress can actually cause a number of health and mood problems. It can also diminish appetite and sleep quality. When you run, you force your body to exert excess energy and hormones. Running also helps to reduce your chances of developing tension headaches.

It may seem surprising to learn all of the different ways that running can improve your health, but the truth of the matter is that these are only a few of the many benefits that it can offer to your body.  Running really is incredibly beneficial to the body, mind, and spirit, and you will find that even short runs can leave you feeling more energized, more focused, and better able to enjoy all that life has to offer.

If you have a sports injury/ injury prevention, physical therapy, sports medicine question or concern the team at TOCA is here to help! To learn more or schedule an appointment call us at: 602-277-6211!

#GlobalRunningDay #run #InjuryPrevention #SportsMedicine #RunnersLife #RunforHealth #KeepRunning #TOCA #TOCAMD

Ankle Sprain

Ankle Sprain

Ankle sprains are very common injuries. There’s a good chance that while playing as a child or stepping on an uneven surface as an adult you sprained your ankle–some 25,000 people do it every day.​​​

Sometimes, it is an awkward moment when you lose your balance, but the pain quickly fades away and you go on your way. But the sprain could be more severe; your ankle might swell and it might hurt too much to stand on it. If it’s a severe sprain, you might have felt a “pop” when the injury happened.

Even though ankle sprains  are common, they are not always minor injuries. Some people with repeated or severe sprains can develop long-term joint pain and weakness. Treating a sprained ankle can help prevent ongoing ankle problems.

A sprained ankle means one or more ligaments on the outer side of your ankle were stretched or torn. If a sprain is not treated properly, you could have long-term problems. Typically the ankle is rolled either inward (inversion sprain) or outward (eversion sprain). Inversion sprains cause pain along the outer side of the ankle and are the most common type. Pain along the inner side of the ankle may represent a more serious injury to the tendons or to the ligaments that support the arch and should always be evaluated by a doctor.

With a mild sprain, the ankle may be tender, swollen, and stiff. But it usually feels stable, and you can walk with little pain. A more serious sprain might include bruising and tenderness around the ankle, and walking is painful. In a severe ankle sprain, the ankle is unstable and may feel “wobbly.”

More about Your Injury

There are 3 grades of ankle sprains:

  • Grade I sprains: Your ligaments are stretched. It is a mild injury that can improve with some light stretching.
  • Grade II sprains: Your ligaments are partially torn. You may need to wear a splint or a cast.
  • Grade III sprains: Your ligaments are fully torn. You may need surgery for this severe injury.

The last 2 kinds of sprains are often associated with tearing of small blood vessels. This allows blood to leak into tissues and cause black and blue color in the area. The blood may not appear for several days. Most of the time it is absorbed from the tissues within 2 weeks.

If your sprain is more severe:

  • You may feel strong pain and have a lot of swelling.
  • You may not be able to walk, or walking may be painful.

Some ankle sprains may become chronic (long-lasting). If this happens to you, your ankle may continue to be:

  • Painful and swollen
  • Weak or giving way easily

What to Expect

Your health care provider may order an x-ray to look for a bone fracture, or an MRI scan to look for an injury to the ligament.

To help your ankle heal, your provider may treat you with a brace, a cast, or a splint, and may give you crutches to walk on. You may be asked to place only part or none of your weight on the bad ankle. You will also need to do physical therapy or exercises to help you recover from the injury.

Self-care

You can decrease swelling by:

  • Resting and not putting weight on your foot

Ice it to keep down the swelling. Don’t put ice directly on the skin (use a thin piece of cloth such as a pillow case between the ice bag and the skin) Apply ice every hour while you are awake, 20 minutes at a time and covered by a towel or bag, for the first 24 hours after the injury. After the first 24 hours, apply ice 20 minutes 3 to 4 times per day.

  • Compression can help control swelling as well as immobilize and support your injury.
  • Elevating your foot on a pillow at or above the level of your heart
  • Pain medicines, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, may help to ease pain and swelling. You can buy these medicines without a prescription. DO NOT use these drugs for the first 24 hours after your injury. They may increase the risk of bleeding. DO NOT take more than the amount recommended on the bottle or more than your provider advises you to take. Carefully read the warnings on the label before taking any medicine.

Getting Active

The pain and swelling of an ankle sprain most often gets better within 48 hours. After that, you can begin to put weight back on your injured foot.

  • Put only as much weight on your foot as is comfortable at first. Slowly work your way up to your full weight.
  • If your ankle begins to hurt, stop and rest.

 

Rehabilitating your Sprained Ankle

Every ligament injury needs rehabilitation. Otherwise, your sprained ankle might not heal completely and you might re-injure it. All ankle sprains, from mild to severe, require three phases of recovery:

  • Phase I includes resting, protecting and reducing swelling of your injured ankle.
  • Phase II includes restoring your ankle’s flexibility, range of motion and strength.
  • Phase III includes gradually returning to straight-ahead activity and doing maintenance exercises, followed later by more cutting sports such as tennis, basketball or football.

Once you can stand on your ankle again, your doctor will prescribe exercise routines to strengthen your muscles and ligaments and increase your flexibility, balance and coordination. Later, you may walk, jog and run figure eights with your ankle taped or in a supportive ankle brace.

It’s important to complete the rehabilitation program because it makes it less likely that you’ll hurt the same ankle again. If you don’t complete rehabilitation, you could suffer chronic pain, instability and arthritis in your ankle. If your ankle still hurts, it could mean that the sprained ligament has not healed right, or that some other injury also happened.

To prevent future sprained ankles, pay attention to your body’s warning signs to slow down when you feel pain or fatigue, and stay in shape with good muscle balance, flexibility and strength in your soft tissues.

Talk to your provider before returning to more intense sports or work activities.

When to Call the Doctor

You should call your provider if you notice any of the following:

  • You cannot walk, or walking is very painful.
  • The pain does not get better after ice, rest, and pain medicine.
  • Your ankle does not feel any better after 5 to 7 days.
  • Your ankle continues to feel weak or gives away easily.
  • Your ankle is increasingly discolored (red or black and blue), or it becomes numb or tingly.

 

If you have an Foot or Ankle Injury, the dedicated team of Orthopedic Physicians and Physical Therapists are here to help. For questions or to schedule an appointment call 602-277-6211!

 

#Results #Recovery #Relief #anklesprain #injuryprevention #sportsinjury #orthopedicinjury #TOCA #TOCAMD #physicaltherapy #healmyankle

 

Men’s Summer Health & Common Sports Injuries

The summer is a great time to build up your fitness program, enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables, take a vacation, and have fun. It’s also a time to pay attention to your health and safety. Below are tips to help you stay safe and healthy this summer and all year long.

Sprains, strains, tendonitis, and even broken bones are all consequences of living an active and athletic lifestyle. Luckily, with the right knowledge and preparation, many injuries can be diminished or entirely prevented.

There are two classes of injuries: traumatic and cumulative. Traumatic injuries are those accidents that happen in sport or daily life, such as rolling your ankle on a trail run or crashing your bike on the morning commute. Cumulative injuries relate to tissue damage that occurs over time as a result of repetitive strain. These types of injuries creep up and may be a function of poor posture, faulty movement patterns, or improper training.

 

The Seven Most Common Sports Injuries

What weekend warriors need to know about preventing and treating the seven most common sports injuries!

After a sedentary work week, end-zone catches and 36-hole weekends can take their toll in common sports injuries. The seven most common sports injuries are:

  1. Ankle sprain
  2. Groin pull
  3. Hamstring strain
  4. Shin splints
  5. Knee injury: ACL tear
  6. Knee injury: Patellofemoral syndrome — injury resulting from the repetitive movement of your kneecap against your thigh bone
  7. Tennis elbow (epicondylitis)

To see how to prevent and treat these common sports injuries — and to learn when it’s time to look further than your medicine cabinet to treat sports injuries— read on.

The most common sports injuries are strains and sprains

Sprains are injuries to ligaments, the tough bands connecting bones in a joint. Suddenly stretching ligaments past their limits deforms or tears them. Strains are injuries to muscle fibers or tendons, which anchor muscles to bones. Strains are called “pulled muscles” for a reason: Over-stretching or overusing a muscle causes tears in the muscle fibers or tendons.

“Think of ligaments and muscle-tendon units like springs,” says William Roberts, MD, sports medicine physician at the University of Minnesota and spokesman for the American College of Sports Medicine. “The tissue lengthens with stress and returns to its normal length — unless it is pulled too far out of its normal range.”

Preventing the most common sports injuries

Sometimes preventing common sports injuries is beyond our control, but many times sports injuries are preventable. “Some injuries,” Roberts says, “we bring on ourselves because we’re not conditioned for the activity.” His advice: “Work out daily and get double benefit — enjoy your weekend activities and garner the health benefits.”

Every workout should start with a gentle warm-up to prevent common sports injuries, says Margot Putukian, MD, director of athletic medicine at Princeton University. “Getting warmed up increases blood flow to the muscles, gets you more flexible, and could decrease injuries,” she adds.

Overuse injuries are common and preventable, according to Putukian. “Don’t come out and hit the ball for an hour after not playing for a while,” she says. Whether it’s hiking, running, or team sports, do some “pre-participation training” first by lightly working the relevant muscle groups in the weeks before the activity.

And learn to recognize when you’ve already left it all on the field. Stop when you are fatigued. Muscle fatigue takes away all your protective mechanisms and really increases your risk of all injuries. You can always come out to play again next weekend — if you don’t get injured today.

Treating the most common sports injuries

Usually, common sports injuries are mild or moderate — there’s some damage, but everything is still in place. You can treat them at home using the PRICE therapy method described later in this article. But you should expect that some common sports injuries may take months to heal, even with good treatment. If a sprain or strain is severe, however, the entire muscle, tendon, or ligament is torn away, and surgery may be needed.

Here are some specific tips for treating each of the most common sports injuries:

1. Ankle sprain

What it is: Most athletes have experienced a sprained ankle, which typically occurs when the foot turns inward. This turning stretches or tears the ligaments on the outside of the ankle, which are relatively weak.

What you can do: With an ankle sprain, it’s important to exercise to prevent loss of flexibility and strength — and re-injury. You can ask your doctor or physical therapist to help you know what kinds of exercise you should do.

When to see a doctor: It’s important to note where the sprain has occurred. A ‘high ankle sprain’ is slower to heal and should probably be seen by a doctor to make sure the bones in the lower leg did not separate. One way to recognize a high ankle sprain is that this sprain usually causes tenderness above the ankle.

2. Groin pull

What it is: Pushing off in a side-to-side motion causes strain of the inner thigh muscles, or groin. Hockey, soccer, football, and baseball are common sports with groin injuries.

What you can do: Compression, ice, and rest will heal most groin injuries. Returning to full activity too quickly can aggravate a groin pull or turn it into a long-term problem.

When to see a doctor: Any groin pull that has significant swelling should be seen early by a physician.

3. Hamstring strain

What it is: Three muscles in the back of the thigh form the hamstring. The hamstring can be over-stretched by movements such as hurdling — kicking the leg out sharply when running. Falling forward while waterskiing is another common cause of hamstring strains.

What you can do: Hamstring injuries are slow to heal because of the constant stress applied to the injured tissue from walking. Complete healing can take six to 12 months. Re-injuries are common because it’s hard for many guys to stay inactive for that long.

4. Shin splints

What they are: Pains down the front of the lower legs are commonly called “shin splints.” They are most often brought on by running — especially when starting a more strenuous training program like long runs on paved roads.

What you can do: Rest, ice, and over-the-counter pain medicine are the mainstays of treatment.

When to see a doctor: The pain of shin splints is rarely an actual stress fracture — a small break in the shin bone. But you should see your doctor if the pain persists, even with rest. Stress fractures require prolonged rest, commonly a month or more to heal.

5. Knee injury: ACL tear

What it is: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) holds the leg bone to the knee. Sudden “cuts” or stops or getting hit from the side can strain or tear the ACL. A complete tear can make the dreaded “pop” sound.

When to see a doctor: Always, if you suspect an ACL injury. ACL tears are potentially the most severe of the common sports injuries. “A completely torn ACL will usually require surgery in individuals who wish to remain physically active.

6: Knee injury: Patellofemoral syndrome

What it is: Patellofemoral syndrome can result from the repetitive movement of your kneecap (patella) against your thigh bone (femur), which can damage the tissue under the kneecap. Running, volleyball, and basketball commonly set it off. One knee or both can be affected.

What you can do: Patience is key. Patellofemoral pain can take up to six weeks to clear up. It’s important to continue low-impact exercise during this time. Working out the quadriceps can also relieve pain.

7. Tennis elbow (epicondylitis)

What it is: Repetitive use of the elbow — for example, during golf or tennis swings — can irritate or make tiny tears in the elbow’s tendons. Epicondylitis is most common in 30- to 60-year-olds and usually involves the outside of the elbow.

What you can do: Epicondylitis can usually be cleared up by staying off the tennis court or golf course until the pain improves.

The PRICE principle for treating common sports injuries

The U.S. Marines say that “pain is weakness leaving your body.” Most of the rest of us would add, “OK, but can’t we hurry it up a little?” The answer is yes. Using the PRICE method to treat any common sports injury will help get you back in the game sooner.

First, it’s important to know that swelling is a normal response to these injuries. Excessive swelling, though, can reduce range of motion and interfere with healing. You can limit swelling and start healing faster after common sports injuries by using the PRICE principle:

  • P — protect from further injury
    For more severe injuries, protect the injured area with a splint, pad, or crutch.
  • R — restrict activity
    Restricting activity will prevent worsening of the injury.
  • I — apply ice
    Apply ice immediately after a common sports injury. “Ice is the miracle drug” for sports injuries, says Putukian. “It’s an anti-inflammatory, without many side effects.” Use ice for 20 minutes every one to two hours for the first 48 hours after the injury. Don’t use heat during this time — it encourages swelling and inflammation.
  • C — apply compression
    Compression with an elastic bandage will help reduce swelling.
  • E — elevate the injured area
    Elevating the injured area above the heart will also reduce swelling.

Over-the-counter pain relievers usually relieve the pain of common sports injuries to a tolerable level. If they don’t, it’s probably time to see a doctor.

When to get medical attention for common sports injuries

We know you’re tough — but you also need to be smart. If you suspect a serious injury or if you have any of these signs, see a doctor:

  • Deformities in the joint or bone — it looks “crooked,” or moves abnormally
  • You cannot bear weight or can’t use the limb without it “giving way”
  • Excessive swelling
  • Changes in skin color beyond mild bruising
  • It’s not getting any better after a few days of PRICE therapy

 

If you are injured the Team of Orthopedic Physicians here at TOCA are here to help! To learn more or schedule an appointment call: 602-277-6211.

 

#Results #Recovery #Relief #Injuryprevention #Menshealth #ShowUsYourBlue #SportsMedicine #SportsInjury #TOCA #TOCAMD

10 Common Summer Injuries

10 Common Summer Injuries – Summer is a season full of beautiful weather, vacations, sports, and other enjoyable outdoor activities. Unfortunately, summer also means an increase in injuries. There are many ways to prevent the injuries that are most common during the summer months, as you and your family enjoy the warm weather. Here you can find helpful tips and facts to help you have a safe and injury-free summer.

1. BICYCLE INJURIES: Wearing a helmet will reduce the chance of a head injury by 85 percent, according to the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute. The use of a bicycle helmet also seriously reduces the chance that a bike accident, which often involves a motor vehicle, will be fatal for the cyclist

2. BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL INJURIES: Since baseball is a non-contact sport, injuries happen with unintentional contact, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. Warming up and stretching can help prevent common strains and sprains. Coaches are also advised to become very familiar with the conditions of their field, and to be prepared for emergency situations with an on-hand first aid kit along with a medical response plan.

3. PLAYGROUND INJURIES: Studies indicate that roughly 7 out of 10 playground injuries happen because of a fall or an equipment failure. Pediatricians are acutely aware of such hazards.

* Ground cover is important. Stay away from concrete and grass. The best ground covering is rubber or wood chips. Also, look for rusty nails or broken equipment.

* Remember to apply sunscreen regularly while enjoying an outdoor playground.

4. ATV, MOPED AND MINI BIKE INJURIES: The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission advises against using ATVs on paved roads, allowing children under the age of 16 to ride adult ATVs, or riding an ATV as a passenger. Additionally, that government agency urges ATV enthusiasts to always wear helmets and protective gear.

5. SOCCER INJURIES: Proper conditioning, stretching, warmups and cool-downs are key to preventing many of these injuries including the severe sprains, torn cartilage and damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs).

6. SWIMMING INJURIES: When spending time at a pool, lake or shoreline with family and friends, designate brief shifts in which an adult is always serving as a “water watcher.”

Here are some other swimming safety tips:

* Never dive into shallow water.

* Jump into lakes, rivers or the sea feet-first, particularly in dark waters, where you can’t see what’s below.

* Stop swimming during inclement weather.

* Try to avoid crowded swimming spots where it’s hard to monitor your group.

* Avoid wearing headphones at the pool or beach, so you can hear any developing trouble.

7. TRAMPOLINE INJURIES: On average orthopedic physicians see one to three patients each week with a trampoline injury. Sprains and fractures are the most common among them but bruises, bumps and bloody noses are also a concern. Here are some of this doctor’s trampoline safety recommendations:

* Allow only one person on a trampoline at any given time.

* Use a trampoline net to minimize falls.

* Make sure the trampoline is situated on a relatively soft surface such as a lawn.

* Make sure the trampoline is secure.

* Keep the trampoline well-maintained. Any damage to the supporting bars or mats present a fresh safety danger.

* Untrained tumblers should avoid somersaults and other “high-risk maneuvers.”

8. VOLLEYBALL INJURIES: Staying fit during the off-season is the best way for regular players to avoid injury during games. Recreational players should remember to stretch and warm up before a game, wear sunscreen and stay hydrated.

9. AM– USEMENT PARK, STATE FAIR AND CARNIVAL RIDE INJURIES: The following are the top ride safety tips from the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions (IAAPA).

* Mind the posted height, weight and health restrictions on each ride.

* Read any posted safety rules for each ride. Responsible parks also have attendants who remind riders about safety rules at the start of each ride.

* Never dangle your hands or feet outside of a ride.

* Always stay in your seat during a ride.

* Always use the straps, belts, crossbars and any other ride safety equipment.

* Make sure your possessions are secure.

10. WATER SPORTS INJURIES: Many of these injuries can be prevented with preseason conditioning and a purposeful warm up before your exercise.

Although doctors regularly treat cuts, strains, sprains and orthopedic injuries from such water sports as jet-skiing and wakeboarding, they also caution against dehydration, which outdoor enthusiasts may forget about while frolicking in or near water.

The team members at TOCA and our Physicians are here to help! To learn more about TOCA and our physicians visit more of our webpages here on: www.tocamd.com or call 602-277-6211!

#Recovery #Results #Relief #TOCAMD #SummerFun #InjuryPrevention#PlaySmart #PlaySafe #SummerSaftey