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Knee Injuries

Common Knee Injuries: Your knee is a complex joint with many components, making it vulnerable to a variety of injuries. Many knee injuries can be successfully treated with simple measures, such as bracing and rehabilitation exercises. Other injuries may require surgery to correct. Knee injury is one of the most common reasons people see their doctors.

Your knee is made up of many important structures, any of which can be injured. The most common knee injuries include fractures around the knee, dislocation, and sprains and tears of soft tissues, like ligaments. In many cases, injuries involve more than one structure in the knee.

Pain and swelling are the most common signs of knee injury. In addition, your knee may catch or lock up. Many knee injuries cause instability — the feeling that your knee is giving way.

Fractures –
The most common bone broken around the knee is the patella. The ends of the femur and tibia where they meet to form the knee joint can also be fractured. Many fractures around the knee are caused by high energy trauma, such as falls from significant heights and motor vehicle collisions.

Dislocation –
A dislocation occurs when the bones of the knee are out of place, either completely or partially. For example, the femur and tibia can be forced out of alignment, and the patella can also slip out of place. Dislocations can be caused by an abnormality in the structure of a person’s knee. In people who have normal knee structure, dislocations are most often caused by high energy trauma, such as falls, motor vehicle crashes, and sports-related contact.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries –
The anterior cruciate ligament is often injured during sports activities. Athletes who participate in high demand sports like soccer, football, and basketball are more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligaments. Changing direction rapidly or landing from a jump incorrectly can tear the ACL. About half of all injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament occur along with damage to other structures in the knee, such as articular cartilage, meniscus, or other ligaments.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries –
The posterior cruciate ligament is often injured from a blow to the front of the knee while the knee is bent. This often occurs in motor vehicle crashes and sports-related contact. Posterior cruciate ligament tears tend to be partial tears with the potential to heal on their own.

Collateral Ligament Injuries –
Injuries to the collateral ligaments are usually caused by a force that pushes the knee sideways. These are often contact injuries. Injuries to the MCL are usually caused by a direct blow to the outside of the knee, and are often sports-related. Blows to the inside of the knee that push the knee outwards may injure the lateral collateral ligament. Lateral collateral ligament tears occur less frequently than other knee injuries.

Meniscal Tears –
Sudden meniscal tears often happen during sports. Tears in the meniscus can occur when twisting, cutting, pivoting, or being tackled. Meniscal tears may also occur as a result of arthritis or aging. Just an awkward twist when getting up from a chair may be enough to cause a tear, if the menisci have weakened with age.

Tendon Tears –
The quadriceps and patellar tendons can be stretched and torn. Although anyone can injure these tendons, tears are more common among middle-aged people who play running or jumping sports. Falls, direct force to the front of the knee, and landing awkwardly from a jump are common causes of knee tendon injuries.

Treatment of Knee Injuries –
When you are first injured, the RICE method — rest, ice, gentle compression and elevation – can help speed your recovery.

Be sure to seek treatment as soon as possible, especially if you:

Hear a popping noise and feel your knee give out at the time of injury
* Have severe pain
* Cannot move the knee
* Begin limping
* Have swelling at the injury site

The type of treatment your doctor recommends will depend on several factors, such as the severity of your injury, your age, general health, and activity level.

Nonsurgical Treatment –
Many knee injuries can be treated with simple measures, such as:

* Immobilization. Your doctor may recommend a brace to prevent your knee from moving. If you have fractured a bone, a cast or brace may hold the bones in place while they heal. To further protect your knee, you may be given crutches to keep you from putting weight on your leg.

* Physical therapy. Specific exercises will restore function to your knee and strengthen the leg muscles that support it.
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines. Drugs like aspirin and ibuprofen reduce pain and swelling.

Surgical Treatment –
Many fractures and injuries around the knee require surgery to fully restore function to your leg. In some cases – such as many ACL tears — surgery can be done arthroscopically using miniature instruments and small incisions. Many injuries require open surgery with a larger incision that provides your surgeon with a more direct view and easier access to the injured structures.

If you are experiencing knee pain and/or a knee injury, the dedicated orthopedic experts at TOCA are here to help! For more information visit our website at: www.tocamd.com or call our dedicated staff at 602-277-6211.

 

#Recovery #Results #Relief #kneepain #fixmedoc

 

 

 

New Year, New You and Your Health

The problem with New Year’s Resolutions is that they’re not always specific enough. This year, as is often the case, two of the top five resolutions relate to fitness and health: #1 is to lose weight and #5 is to “stay fit and healthy.”

When it comes to personal health and well-being, year-long goals are fueled by phrases such as “I will be healthier” and “I will lose weight.” While these statements may be backed by real desire, try accomplishing them by setting targeted healthy living goals, such as those that aim to improve your joint and bone health.

These resolutions may not be the trendiest, but they are a smart investments in your health that will benefit you well beyond a single calendar year.

Many of us have experienced the regret of over doing it, followed by a couple of days of difficulty sitting and standing or even raising our arms above our head. It’s no wonder people fall off the workout wagon after that kind of recovery! Don’t let this happen to you. Follow these three tips to keep your resolution and your momentum in tact:

1. START SLOW: Begin with moderate weight and reasonable reps. It may feel easy, but you will feel the impact the next day if the program is new to you. It’s just like the uncomfortable feeling from eating too much or too fast. Pace yourself. You can always add more [weight, intensity, or reps], but you can’t undo them once they are done.

2. TAKE TURNS: Rotate your emphasis. If you run one day, try biking or swimming the next. When strength training, pair complementary muscle groups and establish a rotation that gives each muscle group an off day in between workouts. For example, train chest and shoulders one day, core and back anther day, and legs and glutes the next day.

3. FEED YOUR SUCCESS: For many people, a new fitness routine is a means to a very important end: weight loss. And exercise goals are often paired with new diets and calorie restrictions. Healthy eating and calorie moderation is always a good idea, but remember a new workout routine means new energy demands on your body. Be sure to hydrate before, during and after you exercise, and plan for a healthy post-workout snack within 30 minutes of completing your routine. Don’t be tempted to skip the snack or a meal. Depriving your body after a workout will only slow your recovery and lead to less healthy eating choices later in the day.

Realistic goals and reasonable plans give you a real chance of success! Happy 2017!

#Recovery #Results #Relief #health #bonehealth #jointhealth

 

 

 

Backpack Safety!

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]When you move your child’s backpack after he or she drops it at the door, does it feel like it contains 40 pounds of rocks? Maybe you’ve noticed your child struggling to put it on, bending forward while carrying it, or complaining of tingling or numbness. If you’ve been concerned about the effects that extra weight might have on your child’s still-growing body, your instincts are correct. Backpacks that are too heavy can cause a lot of problems for kids, like back and shoulder pain, and poor posture. Did you know that according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, injuries from heavy backpacks result in more than 7,000 emergency room visits per year. Sprains, strains, and “overuse” injuries were among the top complaints.

When selecting a backpack, look for:

  • An ergonomic design
  • The correct size: never wider or longer than your child’s torso and never hanging more than 4 inches below the waist
  • Padded back and shoulder straps
  • Hip and chest belts to help transfer some of the weight to the hips and torso
  • Multiple compartments to better distribute the weight
  • Compression straps on the sides or bottom to stabilize the contents
  • Reflective material

Backpack Safety Tips:

  • Your backpack should weigh only 15% – 20% of your total weight
  • Use both shoulder straps to keep the weight of the backpack better distributed
  • Tighten the straps to keep the load closer to the back
  • Organize items and pack heavier things low and towards the center
  • Remove items if the backpack is too heavy and only carry items necessary for the day
  • Lift properly by bending at the knees when picking up a backpack

Remember: A roomy backpack may seem like a good idea, but the more space there is to fill, the more likely your child will fill it. Make sure your child uses both straps when carrying the backpack. Using one strap shifts the weight to one side and causes muscle pain and posture problems.

Help your child determine what is absolutely necessary to carry. If it’s not essential, leave it at home.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]