Dr Lederman, Dr Harmsen and colleagues review strategies to prevent infection in shoulder replacement. *

Title: Preventing infection in shoulder arthroplasty: Navigating the minefields

Abstract

Periprosthetic infection after shoulder arthroplasty represents a devastating complication that often requires extensive revision surgery with substantial economic and patient burden, and ultimately leads to reduced patient function.

Seminars in Arthroplasty

Volume 28, Issue 3, September 2017, Pages 145-149

https://doi.org/10.1053/j.sart.2017.12.006

*This is based on a lecture by Dr Lederman at the 2017 Current Concepts in Shoulder Arthroplasty conference in Las Vegas, NV.

Dr. Lederman and Dr. Harmsen compare different techniques for shoulder replacement*

Title: Glenohumeral osteoarthritis in young patients: Stemless total shoulder arthroplasty trumps resurfacing arthroplasty—Opposes

Samuel Harmsen MD and Evan S Lederman MD

Abstract

When considering shoulder arthroplasty in a younger patient the surgeon can choose between stemmed, stemless or resurfacing implants for humeral reconstruction. Resurfacing arthroplasty can reproduce humeral anatomy independent of the humeral shaft, minimize bone resection and offer potential easier revision surgery. The resurfacing implant has been in use for over 30 years and has favorable long-term outcome.

Seminars in Arthroplasty

Volume 28, Issue 3, September 2017, Pages 121-123
*This is based on a lecture/Debate by Dr. Lederman with Dr. Sumant Krishnan at the 2017 Current Concepts in Shoulder Arthroplasty Conference in Las Vegas, NV.

Dr. Lederman and Dr. Harmsen discuss the challenges and techniques for revision shoulder replacement.*

Title: Humeral cemented revision: Techniques for safe extraction

Samuel Harmsen MD, Evan S. Lederman MD

Abstract

Removing a well-fixed humeral component in revision shoulder arthroplasty can present a difficult challenge. Intraoperative complications including iatrogenic fracture, humeral perforation, segmental bone loss, nerve and soft tissue injury can occur. These complications can occur with both cemented and press-fitted stems and can lead to increased morbidity and decreased functional outcomes. Complete removal of the cement mantle and cement restrictor, when necessary, can present even further challenges. Several extraction techniques have been described that can help minimize complications and enable safe, complete component extraction.

Seminars in Arthroplasty

Volume 28, Issue 3, September 2017, Pages 175-179
*This is based on a lecture by Dr. Lederman at the 2017 Current Concepts in Shoulder Arthroplasty Conference in Las Vegas, NV.