Cast Away: Fishing Safety & Boating in Arizona

Cast Away: Fishing Safety & Boating in Arizona! Arizona is blessed with diverse fishing opportunities, from the large reservoirs to the trout lakes in the mountains, and plenty of low-elevation fishing holes in between. Go out and catch a memory!

Recreational fishing (especially angling) is one of the most popular activities in the world, but as with other sports, it’s not without its risks. Most anglers are careful to avoid the obvious and most dramatic of fishing dangers (dehydration, hooking a finger, boat motor fires, accidental drowning, etc.). However, if you want to keep yourself in top fishing shape, you also have to protect yourself from more mundane fishing hazards – overuse injuries.

As the name states, overuse injuries are caused by too many uninterrupted repetitions of an action. The body parts involved become fatigued to the point of injury; this effect is intensified if the repeated action requires awkward or unnatural movements, such as is sometimes seen in bowling or pitching a baseball. Overuse injuries are notoriously stubborn to cure – but then again, it’s often those with the injuries that are stubborn. Because you must treat an overuse injury with rest (which means taking a sometimes lengthy break from the beloved activity that cause the injury in the first place), many people make the mistake of returning to activity before their injury is fully healed, creating a vicious cycle that can be difficult to break.

Angling provides the perfect conditions for an overuse injury thanks to the repetitive movements of casting coupled with the bad body mechanics that are common to so many people. As is often said, prevention is the best medicine. With a few simple tweaks, you can help stop overuse injuries from ruining your fishing trips.

Although it might sound silly, you should prepare in advance of a fishing trip the way you would for other athletic events. Keeping yourself in good physical condition will give you the endurance you need for long fishing sessions, and you will be less plagued by the aches and pains that can make your trip less enjoyable. Besides eating a balanced diet and exercising regularly, you should include stretching and strengthening exercises specifically geared for the muscles you will use during angling – your abdominals, back, and upper body.
Because fishing trips are often all-day affairs, it’s important to change up your activity. Alternate sitting and standing – but do both with good posture – to avoid unnecessary stress on your back and feet. Switch your grip and casting style throughout the day so no one motion or position is repeated excessively (and as an added bonus, this will help you master a diversity of fishing styles). And perhaps most important of all, take breaks to rest, even if you don’t feel tired. Remember that most people don’t realize they are developing an overuse injury until it’s too late.

Lastly, be realistic about your abilities. Seek coaching to fix any bad body mechanics you may have during casting. Shooting heads and sinking weights put extra strain on the wrists, elbows, and shoulders of anglers who aren’t adept at their use, so avoid them for all but short periods of time if you fall into this category. In addition, using heavy or long rods, longer lines, and fishing for heavy fish should all be engaged in sparingly unless you are expert enough to do so correctly.

Fishing memories can last a lifetime, so don’t let an overuse injury keep you from enjoying the water with your friends and family.
You throw a hook into the water, you sit and wait for a bite or you reel back in. Fishing is a great pastime, but in order for it to be truly enjoyable, you must be safe. Keep these important guidelines and tips in mind for a safe fishing experience.Image result for arizona fishing

1. Get physically prepared.
You don’t necessarily need to be in top physical shape to catch a fish, but you do need to be able to navigate in and out of a boat or possibly across rocks to your favorite fishing spot. Since regular physical activity is essential for your family’s health, make sure you stick to a daily fitness routine leading up to fishing season. Consider visiting the local pool to brush up on your swimming strokes in the case you fall out of the boat or into the water from the shore.

2. Check your fishing gear.
Fishing lines get old and tangled, fishing poles get worn, and lures can break. Open up your tackle box and discard broken fishing tackle. Restring your pole if the line looks ragged and replace your reel or pole if showing signs of damage. The last thing you want to do is cast out and hook someone or yourself due to faulty fishing gear. If you are going out on a boat, do a boat safety check and make sure your life vests are in good condition.

3. Dress up for the occasion.
Sturdy, protective footwear is especially important when fishing. It can keep you from cutting your foot on obstacles in the water or on shore, keep your feet warm, and prevent slipping. Wear clothing according to the weather conditions, choosing attire that will keep you cool in the heat and warm in the cold. Wear sunscreen regardless of temperature and consider a hat that shades your ears and face. Be sure you and the kids don those life vests if you are on the water. Life jackets are also important if you are wading in deep waters that have strong currents. Even if you are an excellent swimmer, a life jacket can help keep you safe in the event that you fall and hit your head.

4. Pack a first aid kit.
Image result for first aid kitWhile you are hoping for the big catch, you may fall and sustain a cut, get bit by insects, or get a hook in the hand. A first aid kit can come to the rescue for many injuries.
For scrapes and cuts, rinse the wound with clean water (this doesn’t mean pond water) and stop the bleeding by compressing with a clean cloth. Apply an antibiotic cream and cover with a bandage. Try to keep the area dry, changing bandage as needed.

For insect bites and stings, clean area with water, apply a cold compress if available, apply antibiotic cream, and take acetominophen or ibuprofen for pain. Be sure to remove ticks and stingers, if present, before treating. To avoid bites and stings, apply an insect repellent before you start fishing.

When it comes to fishing hooks, if the hook is embedded in the head or face, in a joint, or near an artery, seek medical help immediately. If the hook is embedded in the finger or elsewhere in the skin, clean area with soapy water. Tie a long piece of fishing line to the rounded part of the hook. Push the hook shank parallel with the skin and give the fishing line a firm, sharp yank. The hook should come right out of the entry point. Wash the area again and apply an antiobiotic ointment and bandage to keep it clean and dry.
Note: Be sure your family is current on your tetanus vaccinations.

5. Stay aware of your fellow fishers.
Keep distance between you and your fellow fishers to avoid hook or pole injuries when casting. Safety glasses are a good idea for kids to protect their eyes, especially as they hone their fishing skills. In addition, always know where your family members are and don’t let your kids fish alone. Employ the buddy system.
New anglers. Should always learn how to cast overhead first. This cast teaches the proper technique and is safer than side casts.

6. Never go fishing alone. Always fish with someone else and, ideally, with two other people. If one person is injured or in danger, a second person can stay with them while the third person seeks help. This is especially important when rock fishing. Let somebody know the location of your fishing trip, who you are going with and an approximate time you will be back.

7. Weather and fishing
Staying aware of weather conditions is an important part of fishing safety. Make sure you have the most up-to-date local weather information available and be prepared for sudden changes. For coastal locations, take particular note of unexpected tide and swell conditions.

Additional Fishing and Boating Safety Tips: 
• No drinking or using drugs while driving a boat.
• Abide by boat speeds and wake zone laws.
• Stay alert of debris, stumps, boulders when boating.
• Stay off of the water if there are lightning storms.
• Use your boat lights at night.
• Keep an extra fully-charged battery on board.
• Use caution with hooks, like baiting, knot tying, rigging.
• Don’t fish in unrestricted zones.
• Be sure you keep your area organized and clean.
• Carry maps of the areas you will be at.
• Bring a cell phone.
• Stay hydrated.

Arizona fishing and boating trips can range from a day of casting for trophy largemouth bass to fly-fishing for brown trout on Woods Canyon Lake. In order to experience the best fishing in Arizona, check for updates to fishing regulations, read local fishing reports, and find the best spot.

These 11 Amazing Spots In Arizona Are Perfect To Go Fishing
Image result for arizona fishing• Big Lake
• Cluff Ranch Ponds
• Dead Horse Lake
• Dogtown Lake
• Lake Pleasant
• Lake Powell
• Oak Creek
• Peña Blanca Lake
• Riggs Flat Lake
• Saguaro Lake
• Tonto Creek

 

 

If you experience an injury during your summer activities the Team at TOCA is here to help! Learn more about our Orthopedic Surgeons, Sports Medicine Physicians and Physical Therapy Team. To schedule an appointment call 602-277-6211!

Read more about summer time outdoors in Arizona: Arizona Hiking Tips: Take a Hike. Do it Right.     10 Common Summer Injuries  Men’s Summer Health & Common Sports Injuries

#Results #Recovery #Relief #family #summer #fishingfun #fishingsafety #TOCA #TOCAMD #AZFishing

Men’s Summer Health & Common Sports Injuries

The summer is a great time to build up your fitness program, enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables, take a vacation, and have fun. It’s also a time to pay attention to your health and safety. Below are tips to help you stay safe and healthy this summer and all year long.

Sprains, strains, tendonitis, and even broken bones are all consequences of living an active and athletic lifestyle. Luckily, with the right knowledge and preparation, many injuries can be diminished or entirely prevented.

There are two classes of injuries: traumatic and cumulative. Traumatic injuries are those accidents that happen in sport or daily life, such as rolling your ankle on a trail run or crashing your bike on the morning commute. Cumulative injuries relate to tissue damage that occurs over time as a result of repetitive strain. These types of injuries creep up and may be a function of poor posture, faulty movement patterns, or improper training.

 

The Seven Most Common Sports Injuries

What weekend warriors need to know about preventing and treating the seven most common sports injuries!

After a sedentary work week, end-zone catches and 36-hole weekends can take their toll in common sports injuries. The seven most common sports injuries are:

  1. Ankle sprain
  2. Groin pull
  3. Hamstring strain
  4. Shin splints
  5. Knee injury: ACL tear
  6. Knee injury: Patellofemoral syndrome — injury resulting from the repetitive movement of your kneecap against your thigh bone
  7. Tennis elbow (epicondylitis)

To see how to prevent and treat these common sports injuries — and to learn when it’s time to look further than your medicine cabinet to treat sports injuries— read on.

The most common sports injuries are strains and sprains

Sprains are injuries to ligaments, the tough bands connecting bones in a joint. Suddenly stretching ligaments past their limits deforms or tears them. Strains are injuries to muscle fibers or tendons, which anchor muscles to bones. Strains are called “pulled muscles” for a reason: Over-stretching or overusing a muscle causes tears in the muscle fibers or tendons.

“Think of ligaments and muscle-tendon units like springs,” says William Roberts, MD, sports medicine physician at the University of Minnesota and spokesman for the American College of Sports Medicine. “The tissue lengthens with stress and returns to its normal length — unless it is pulled too far out of its normal range.”

Preventing the most common sports injuries

Sometimes preventing common sports injuries is beyond our control, but many times sports injuries are preventable. “Some injuries,” Roberts says, “we bring on ourselves because we’re not conditioned for the activity.” His advice: “Work out daily and get double benefit — enjoy your weekend activities and garner the health benefits.”

Every workout should start with a gentle warm-up to prevent common sports injuries, says Margot Putukian, MD, director of athletic medicine at Princeton University. “Getting warmed up increases blood flow to the muscles, gets you more flexible, and could decrease injuries,” she adds.

Overuse injuries are common and preventable, according to Putukian. “Don’t come out and hit the ball for an hour after not playing for a while,” she says. Whether it’s hiking, running, or team sports, do some “pre-participation training” first by lightly working the relevant muscle groups in the weeks before the activity.

And learn to recognize when you’ve already left it all on the field. Stop when you are fatigued. Muscle fatigue takes away all your protective mechanisms and really increases your risk of all injuries. You can always come out to play again next weekend — if you don’t get injured today.

Treating the most common sports injuries

Usually, common sports injuries are mild or moderate — there’s some damage, but everything is still in place. You can treat them at home using the PRICE therapy method described later in this article. But you should expect that some common sports injuries may take months to heal, even with good treatment. If a sprain or strain is severe, however, the entire muscle, tendon, or ligament is torn away, and surgery may be needed.

Here are some specific tips for treating each of the most common sports injuries:

1. Ankle sprain

What it is: Most athletes have experienced a sprained ankle, which typically occurs when the foot turns inward. This turning stretches or tears the ligaments on the outside of the ankle, which are relatively weak.

What you can do: With an ankle sprain, it’s important to exercise to prevent loss of flexibility and strength — and re-injury. You can ask your doctor or physical therapist to help you know what kinds of exercise you should do.

When to see a doctor: It’s important to note where the sprain has occurred. A ‘high ankle sprain’ is slower to heal and should probably be seen by a doctor to make sure the bones in the lower leg did not separate. One way to recognize a high ankle sprain is that this sprain usually causes tenderness above the ankle.

2. Groin pull

What it is: Pushing off in a side-to-side motion causes strain of the inner thigh muscles, or groin. Hockey, soccer, football, and baseball are common sports with groin injuries.

What you can do: Compression, ice, and rest will heal most groin injuries. Returning to full activity too quickly can aggravate a groin pull or turn it into a long-term problem.

When to see a doctor: Any groin pull that has significant swelling should be seen early by a physician.

3. Hamstring strain

What it is: Three muscles in the back of the thigh form the hamstring. The hamstring can be over-stretched by movements such as hurdling — kicking the leg out sharply when running. Falling forward while waterskiing is another common cause of hamstring strains.

What you can do: Hamstring injuries are slow to heal because of the constant stress applied to the injured tissue from walking. Complete healing can take six to 12 months. Re-injuries are common because it’s hard for many guys to stay inactive for that long.

4. Shin splints

What they are: Pains down the front of the lower legs are commonly called “shin splints.” They are most often brought on by running — especially when starting a more strenuous training program like long runs on paved roads.

What you can do: Rest, ice, and over-the-counter pain medicine are the mainstays of treatment.

When to see a doctor: The pain of shin splints is rarely an actual stress fracture — a small break in the shin bone. But you should see your doctor if the pain persists, even with rest. Stress fractures require prolonged rest, commonly a month or more to heal.

5. Knee injury: ACL tear

What it is: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) holds the leg bone to the knee. Sudden “cuts” or stops or getting hit from the side can strain or tear the ACL. A complete tear can make the dreaded “pop” sound.

When to see a doctor: Always, if you suspect an ACL injury. ACL tears are potentially the most severe of the common sports injuries. “A completely torn ACL will usually require surgery in individuals who wish to remain physically active.

6: Knee injury: Patellofemoral syndrome

What it is: Patellofemoral syndrome can result from the repetitive movement of your kneecap (patella) against your thigh bone (femur), which can damage the tissue under the kneecap. Running, volleyball, and basketball commonly set it off. One knee or both can be affected.

What you can do: Patience is key. Patellofemoral pain can take up to six weeks to clear up. It’s important to continue low-impact exercise during this time. Working out the quadriceps can also relieve pain.

7. Tennis elbow (epicondylitis)

What it is: Repetitive use of the elbow — for example, during golf or tennis swings — can irritate or make tiny tears in the elbow’s tendons. Epicondylitis is most common in 30- to 60-year-olds and usually involves the outside of the elbow.

What you can do: Epicondylitis can usually be cleared up by staying off the tennis court or golf course until the pain improves.

The PRICE principle for treating common sports injuries

The U.S. Marines say that “pain is weakness leaving your body.” Most of the rest of us would add, “OK, but can’t we hurry it up a little?” The answer is yes. Using the PRICE method to treat any common sports injury will help get you back in the game sooner.

First, it’s important to know that swelling is a normal response to these injuries. Excessive swelling, though, can reduce range of motion and interfere with healing. You can limit swelling and start healing faster after common sports injuries by using the PRICE principle:

  • P — protect from further injury
    For more severe injuries, protect the injured area with a splint, pad, or crutch.
  • R — restrict activity
    Restricting activity will prevent worsening of the injury.
  • I — apply ice
    Apply ice immediately after a common sports injury. “Ice is the miracle drug” for sports injuries, says Putukian. “It’s an anti-inflammatory, without many side effects.” Use ice for 20 minutes every one to two hours for the first 48 hours after the injury. Don’t use heat during this time — it encourages swelling and inflammation.
  • C — apply compression
    Compression with an elastic bandage will help reduce swelling.
  • E — elevate the injured area
    Elevating the injured area above the heart will also reduce swelling.

Over-the-counter pain relievers usually relieve the pain of common sports injuries to a tolerable level. If they don’t, it’s probably time to see a doctor.

When to get medical attention for common sports injuries

We know you’re tough — but you also need to be smart. If you suspect a serious injury or if you have any of these signs, see a doctor:

  • Deformities in the joint or bone — it looks “crooked,” or moves abnormally
  • You cannot bear weight or can’t use the limb without it “giving way”
  • Excessive swelling
  • Changes in skin color beyond mild bruising
  • It’s not getting any better after a few days of PRICE therapy

 

If you are injured the Team of Orthopedic Physicians here at TOCA are here to help! To learn more or schedule an appointment call: 602-277-6211.

 

#Results #Recovery #Relief #Injuryprevention #Menshealth #ShowUsYourBlue #SportsMedicine #SportsInjury #TOCA #TOCAMD

10 Common Summer Injuries

10 Common Summer Injuries – Summer is a season full of beautiful weather, vacations, sports, and other enjoyable outdoor activities. Unfortunately, summer also means an increase in injuries. There are many ways to prevent the injuries that are most common during the summer months, as you and your family enjoy the warm weather. Here you can find helpful tips and facts to help you have a safe and injury-free summer.

1. BICYCLE INJURIES: Wearing a helmet will reduce the chance of a head injury by 85 percent, according to the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute. The use of a bicycle helmet also seriously reduces the chance that a bike accident, which often involves a motor vehicle, will be fatal for the cyclist

2. BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL INJURIES: Since baseball is a non-contact sport, injuries happen with unintentional contact, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. Warming up and stretching can help prevent common strains and sprains. Coaches are also advised to become very familiar with the conditions of their field, and to be prepared for emergency situations with an on-hand first aid kit along with a medical response plan.

3. PLAYGROUND INJURIES: Studies indicate that roughly 7 out of 10 playground injuries happen because of a fall or an equipment failure. Pediatricians are acutely aware of such hazards.

* Ground cover is important. Stay away from concrete and grass. The best ground covering is rubber or wood chips. Also, look for rusty nails or broken equipment.

* Remember to apply sunscreen regularly while enjoying an outdoor playground.

4. ATV, MOPED AND MINI BIKE INJURIES: The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission advises against using ATVs on paved roads, allowing children under the age of 16 to ride adult ATVs, or riding an ATV as a passenger. Additionally, that government agency urges ATV enthusiasts to always wear helmets and protective gear.

5. SOCCER INJURIES: Proper conditioning, stretching, warmups and cool-downs are key to preventing many of these injuries including the severe sprains, torn cartilage and damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs).

6. SWIMMING INJURIES: When spending time at a pool, lake or shoreline with family and friends, designate brief shifts in which an adult is always serving as a “water watcher.”

Here are some other swimming safety tips:

* Never dive into shallow water.

* Jump into lakes, rivers or the sea feet-first, particularly in dark waters, where you can’t see what’s below.

* Stop swimming during inclement weather.

* Try to avoid crowded swimming spots where it’s hard to monitor your group.

* Avoid wearing headphones at the pool or beach, so you can hear any developing trouble.

7. TRAMPOLINE INJURIES: On average orthopedic physicians see one to three patients each week with a trampoline injury. Sprains and fractures are the most common among them but bruises, bumps and bloody noses are also a concern. Here are some of this doctor’s trampoline safety recommendations:

* Allow only one person on a trampoline at any given time.

* Use a trampoline net to minimize falls.

* Make sure the trampoline is situated on a relatively soft surface such as a lawn.

* Make sure the trampoline is secure.

* Keep the trampoline well-maintained. Any damage to the supporting bars or mats present a fresh safety danger.

* Untrained tumblers should avoid somersaults and other “high-risk maneuvers.”

8. VOLLEYBALL INJURIES: Staying fit during the off-season is the best way for regular players to avoid injury during games. Recreational players should remember to stretch and warm up before a game, wear sunscreen and stay hydrated.

9. AM– USEMENT PARK, STATE FAIR AND CARNIVAL RIDE INJURIES: The following are the top ride safety tips from the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions (IAAPA).

* Mind the posted height, weight and health restrictions on each ride.

* Read any posted safety rules for each ride. Responsible parks also have attendants who remind riders about safety rules at the start of each ride.

* Never dangle your hands or feet outside of a ride.

* Always stay in your seat during a ride.

* Always use the straps, belts, crossbars and any other ride safety equipment.

* Make sure your possessions are secure.

10. WATER SPORTS INJURIES: Many of these injuries can be prevented with preseason conditioning and a purposeful warm up before your exercise.

Although doctors regularly treat cuts, strains, sprains and orthopedic injuries from such water sports as jet-skiing and wakeboarding, they also caution against dehydration, which outdoor enthusiasts may forget about while frolicking in or near water.

The team members at TOCA and our Physicians are here to help! To learn more about TOCA and our physicians visit more of our webpages here on: www.tocamd.com or call 602-277-6211!

#Recovery #Results #Relief #TOCAMD #SummerFun #InjuryPrevention#PlaySmart #PlaySafe #SummerSaftey

Dr. Cummings and Vito Berlingeri talk Golf, injuries and recovery in the latest addition of the AZ Golf Insider!

Dr. Cummings and Vito Berlingeri talk Golf, injuries and recovery in the latest addition of the AZ Golf Insider. Check out the full artical by clicking here: http://staging.yudu.com/…/…/45vcVtT1Y15VmxzM/html/index.html

“When I went into his office, Dr. Cummings greeted me like he had known me for 30 years”, said Berlingeri. “He told me with surgery and physical rehab, I would be back to hitting golf balls within seven weeks.”

That’s exactly what happened, with Berlingeri able to play 18 holes just three months after surgery.

Associated with TOCA since 2001, Dr. Cummings estimates that up to 40% of the patients he sees play golf, including numerous PGA Tour professionals. No matter the skill level, he encourages all golfers to take injury prevention measures, especially keeping your core strong.

“Your body only has so much time before wear and tear happens. I’ve recommended other golfer friends with injuries go to Dr. Cummings at TOCA ever since.” (said Vito Berlingeri)

Getting an accurate diagnosis and then a plan is critical to the process, Berlingeri and his physician (Dr. Dean Cummings) agreed.

“You have to spend at least 10-15 minutes warming up in what I call a combination dynamic and static workout. That’s doing some stretches plus some movement patterns. I also recommend stretching while you’re playing.”

“At TOCA we provide an excellent assessment while looking at the whole body and not just an individual body part,” Dr. Cummings said. “We also make sure that each patient is treated with conservative therapeutic management first, and then surgery if needed. I think we have doctors in our group who are phenomenally gifted, but the good thing is they know when to operate, which is very important.”

Dr. P. Dean Cummings is an Orthopedic Surgeon & Sports Medicine Physician and Surgeon at TOCA.

To learn more about Dr. Cummings and TOCA or to schedule an appointment visit: www.tocamd.com or call 602-277-6211!

#Results #Recovery #Relife #Golf #AZGolf #AZGolfInsider #AGA#BunkertoBunker #TOCA #TOCAMD 

TOCA (The Orthopedic Clinic Association) Performs First Meniscus Replacements in Arizona

TOCA (The Orthopedic Clinic Association) Performs First Meniscus Replacements in Arizona with NUsurface® Meniscus Implant: Phoenix Suns Physician Treats Local Resident with Persistent Knee Pain in SUN Clinical Trial – Dr. Thomas R. Carter.

PHOENIX, Arizona – March 24th, 2017 – TOCA (The Orthopedic Clinic Association), a one-stop resource for orthopedics in Arizona , and Active Implants, a company that develops orthopedic implant solutions, today announced that the first meniscus replacement procedures in Arizona were successfully performed by Dr. Tom Carter. TOCA is the only center in the state – and one of just 10 sites nationwide – enrolling patients with persistent knee pain caused by injured or deteriorating meniscus cartilage in the SUN trial, which is designed to assess the safety and effectiveness of the NUsurface® Meniscus Implant (pronounced “new surface”) in restoring function similar to that of a natural, healthy meniscus.

The first patient to receive the implant in Arizona was Sean Kirkman, a 47-year-old Phoenix resident and owner of Doggy Daze, who tore his meniscus 12 years ago after years of snow skiing and playing softball. Although he underwent several partial meniscectomies to treat the tear on his left knee, he experienced constant pain requiring him to wear a knee brace for the last 10 years in attempts to stabilize his knee. Kirkman’s knee was consistently throbbing with pain whether he was sitting, walking or playing sports. The pain became so intense, he had to quit playing softball.

The meniscus is a tissue pad between the thigh and shin bones. Once damaged, the meniscus has a very limited ability to heal. Over 1 million partial meniscectomies to remove or repair a torn meniscus are performed in the U.S. every year, about the same as the total number of hip and knee replacement surgeries combined. However, many patients still experience persistent knee pain following meniscus surgery.

“There aren’t many options for patients who experience persistent knee pain following meniscus surgery,” said Dr. Tom Carter, orthopedic surgeon at TOCA. “We hope the NUsurface implant alleviates pain in these patients, helps them delay or avoid knee replacement surgery, and gets them back to the activities they enjoy.”

Kirk received the NUsurface Meniscus Implant on October 20 through a small incision in his knee and completed a six-week rehabilitation program. Five months into his recovery, Kirk is most looking forward to getting back into snow skiing.

“My knee pain over the last 12 years was completely psyche changing as I was too young for knee replacement and had resigned myself to just living with the pain,” Kirk said. “A couple weeks after receiving the NUsurface Meniscus Implant, my debilitating knee pain had subsided and I no longer felt the need for a knee brace I had been wearing the last decade. I can finally walk around to places and resume my life.”

The NUsurface Meniscus Implant has been used in Europe under CE Mark since 2008 and Israel since 2011.

About the Clinical Trial
The SUN study (Safety Using NUsurface®) will enroll approximately 120 patients as part of regulatory process to gain approval from FDA to sell the device in the U.S. All patients who meet study requirements and agree to enter the trial are offered the NUsurface Meniscus Implant as treatment. Treatment with NUsurface in the SUN trial is eligible for coverage by Medicare and some private insurance companies. To be eligible for the study, participants must be between the ages of 30 and 75 and have pain after medial meniscus surgery that was performed at least six months ago. To learn more about the SUN study, please visit http://sun-trial.com or call (844) 680-8951.

About the NUsurface® Meniscus Implant
The NUsurface® Meniscus Implant is an investigational treatment for patients with persistent knee pain following medial meniscus surgery. It is made from medical grade plastic and, as a result of its unique materials, composite structure and design, does not require fixation to bone or soft tissues. The NUsurface Meniscus Implant mimics the function of the natural meniscus and redistributes loads transmitted across the knee joint. Clinical trials are underway in the U.S., Europe and Israel to verify the safety and effectiveness of the NUsurface Meniscus Implant.

About TOCA (The Orthopedic Clinic Association)
TOCA (The Orthopedic Clinic Association) has served the Valley with orthopedic care since it was founded in 1949. TOCA is a one-stop resource for orthopedics in Arizona, led by nationally recognized, established orthopedic physicians who are passionate about quality care. TOCA brings expertise in orthopedics and sports medicine, numerous sub-specialties, physical therapy and hand therapy. Each TOCA Physician brings their own passion and integrity to a common purpose, honoring TOCA’s mission statement: “Serving our Patients through Innovative and Comprehensive Orthopedic Care.” Our physicians and staff are dedicated to providing for each person’s needs and ensuring the highest level of care for a wide range of musculoskeletal conditions. For more information, visit https://tocamd.com/.

About Active Implants
Active Implants, LLC develops orthopedic implant solutions that complement the natural biomechanics of the musculoskeletal system, allowing patients to maintain or return to an active lifestyle. Active Implants is privately held with headquarters in Memphis, Tennessee. European offices are in Driebergen, The Netherlands, with R&D facilities in Netanya, Israel. For more information, visit www.activeimplants.com.

 

CAUTION Investigational device. Limited by United States law to investigational use.

To learn more or to schedule a consultation with Dr. Carter visit www.tocamd.com or call 602-277-6211!

#RESULTS. #RECOVERY. #RELIEF #orthopedicimplants #activeimplants#DrCarter

March 2017 is Cheerleading Safety Month!

March 2017 is Cheerleading Safety Month! Safety is a big concern in all sports and cheerleading is no exception. Because it combines both stunting and gymnastics, there are many opportunities for accidents if the proper precautions aren’t taken. While we often think of them as being nothing more than entertainment on the sidelines, cheerleaders serve a vital role, and the stunts they pull are demanding both mentally and physically. Cheerleading Safety Month comes each year to raise awareness that safety is vital to the health and performance of our team’s biggest supporters.

Basic Cheer Safety:
* Remove all jewelry
* Wear athletic shoes
* Keep your hair tied back
* Always have supervision
* Practice on safe surfaces such as mats and padded floors
* Have an emergency plan

In order to stay out of harm’s way and still perform spectacular stunts, there are a few basic guidelines that must be followed:
* Get proper instruction
* Always use a spotter
* Follow proper progression
* Practice proper technique
* Don’t push it
* Focus
* Warm up
* Communicate
* Don’t ignore injuries
* Stay in shape

Of course, cheerleading safety should be practiced any time cheerleading is being performed, but March – Cheerleading Safety Month – provides the perfect opportunity to shine the spotlight on cheerleading safety.

March often marks the winding down of basketball season and with it most school cheerleading will also come to an end. Soon, tryouts for the next season will take place, giving coaches the opportunity to implement their safety programs for a new team.

There are four groups directly responsible for the safety of the cheerleader – the administration, the coaches, the cheerleaders themselves, and the cheerleaders’ parents. Each can use this month to focus on cheerleading safety and enhance safety in their programs.

Administrators, are you involved in your cheer program? Make sure you have selected a qualified coach to supervise the team and give them sufficient support. At a minimum, the coach should complete the American Association of Cheerleading Coaches and Administrators safety course. Coaches should also take advantage of any other training available, such as training provided by the National Federation of State High School Associations or the US All Star Federation. They should be encouraged to attend camps, clinics and coaching conferences in order to further their knowledge of skill techniques. As an administrator, you should make sure your program has adequate practice facilities and matting and that the coach is following the safety rules.

Coaches, are you fully aware of your responsibilities with regard to safety? You should make sure your cheerleaders are using proper skill progressions. Don’t pressure your cheerleaders to try skills they are not ready to attempt. You or someone at practice, such as a coach’s assistant, should be CPR certified and trained in basic first aid. Make sure that you are following recognized safety rules and practices (AACCA, NFHS or USASF) outlined for your program. Develop and practice an emergency plan in the event a serious injury occurs.

Cheerleaders, you too have a responsibility for your own safety. If you feel scared about a particular stunt or tumbling skill, voice your concerns to your coach or parent. Take stunting very seriously, and stay focused on the skill and your part in it until it is safely completed. Practice good health and fitness habits so you can perform to the best of your ability. Remember, others are relying on you to be at your best during every performance.

Parents, use your voice! Know the safety rules, and If you find that standard practices aren’t being employed, bring it to the attention of the coach. If that doesn’t resolve the matter, do not hesitate to take your concerns to the administration. Ultimately, if you feel that your child’s safety is being compromised, take the difficult step of removing them from the program.

Cheerleading can be a safe and healthy activity when it is properly supervised. Let’s use this month of awareness to make sure we are all doing our part!

History of Cheerleading Safety Month
As the basketball season winds down to a close, Cheerleading tryout season often starts, and a bunch of intrepid new group comes to pick up the pom-pom and start down the demanding path of becoming a cheerleader. With the Administrators, Coaches, the Cheerleaders Parents, and Cheerleaders all working together, an education on how to perform at their very best while being safe in their efforts can be passed on and absorbed.
Cheerleading has been around for a long time, since the late 1800’s in fact, and believe it or not back then it was an all-male sport. From 1877-1923, it was the men that led the cheers, that helped to support their team, and in 1898 the idea of organized teams entered the scene. It wasn’t until 1923 that there women actually entered the field of cheerleading, and it took until 1940 for them to actually be recognized in things like student pamphlets and newspapers.
In 1987 the American Association of Cheerleading Coaches & Administrators was formed, and it wasn’t long after that that the important of safety education among Cheerleaders and those who trained them became obvious. This was the first seeds of National Cheerleading Safety Month coming to pass.

How To Celebrate Cheerleading Safety Month
There are a number of great ways to celebrate Cheerleading Safety Month, starting with being an active advocate for safety in your local cheerleading squad. This is a special opportunity for parents and administrators, a chance to make certain that your children or team is observing all the necessary safety practices to ensure they have a great, and safe, time.
You can also make contact with the National Cheer Safety Foundation to register as an official Cheer Safety Ambassador with their organization. This allows you to report injuries in cheerleading, build an emergency plan, and generally be a great asset to your team, your children, and their safety.

 

For more information on orthopedic sports medicine call 602-277-6211!

#cheersafe#Results#Recovery#Relief#Gameon#Sportsmedicine#Injuryprevention

Congratulations Dr. Evan Lederman!

Congratulations Dr. Evan Lederman (Arthroscopic Surgery, Sports Medicine, Shoulder & Knee Reconstruction Orthopedic Physician and Surgeon at TOCA)! Dr. Lederman has been invited as a speaker to the 2017 Current Concepts in Joint Replacement (CCJR). The 18th annual course is held in Las Vegas, Nevada annually in May. The CCJR meeting is one of the largest joint replacement in the US with over 1,000 attendees.

Dr. Lederman will be speaking on topics such as “Controversies in Shoulder Reconstruction”, “Preventing Infection in Shoulder Arthroplasty: Navigating the Minefields”, “What would YOU do? Challenges in Shoulder Surgery” and “Tips, Tidbits & Surgical Pearls: Critical Keys to Success in Shoulder Arthroplasty – Humeral Cemented Revision: Techniques for Safe Extraction”.

To learn more about Dr. Lederman or to schedule an appointment visit www.tocamd.com or call 602-277-6211!

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The course is open to orthopaedic surgeons, residents, nurses, and members of the orthopaedic and allied health industries.

• This meeting will focus on both primary and revision outcomes, surgical approaches, new materials and design as well as address problems of articulation choice, fixation, bone deficiency, instability, trauma, and infection for hip, knee, and shoulder replacement.

• Topics delve into a triad of design, patient factors and technical proficiency responsible for achieving clinical longevity in hip, knee, and shoulder reconstruction.

• Hemi and total shoulder arthroplasty topics focus on improved instrumentation, design modularity, evolving surgical techniques, and optimal patient outcomes.

• An assemblage of contemporary thought leaders will probe the boundaries of these problems and offer solutions for joint pathologies where arthroplasty is indicated.

• An assemblage of contemporary thought leaders will probe the boundaries of these problems and offer solutions for joint pathologies where arthroplasty is indicated.

• Plenary commentary, didactic clinical reports, technique videos, debate, case challenges, and live surgery define the formats of presentation, which provide an optimal learning opportunity for orthopaedic surgeons and other allied professionals involved in joint reconstruction.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

As a result of attending this symposium, the participant will be able to:

• Appraise evolving surgical techniques and implant technologies through didactic and interactive live presentation as well as evaluate early and long-term clinical outcomes.

• Identify problems and concerns relevant to hip, knee, and shoulder arthroplasty including polyethylene wear, short and long term tissue response, inter-component failure, and peri-prosthetic fracture.

• Discuss optimal clinical application of current and evolving fixation techniques in primary and revision procedures including cement, hydroxyapatite, porous coating, press fit, impaction grafting, and evolving porous metal technologies

• Appreciate current solution options for hip, knee and shoulder arthroplasty failure where revision is an endpoint and understand the contributory roles of bone loss, soft tissue deficiency, and infection.

ACCREDITATION STATEMENT

The Current Concepts Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

#Recovery #Results #Relief #JointReplacement #Orthopedics#Sportsmedicine

Knee Injuries

Common Knee Injuries: Your knee is a complex joint with many components, making it vulnerable to a variety of injuries. Many knee injuries can be successfully treated with simple measures, such as bracing and rehabilitation exercises. Other injuries may require surgery to correct. Knee injury is one of the most common reasons people see their doctors.

Your knee is made up of many important structures, any of which can be injured. The most common knee injuries include fractures around the knee, dislocation, and sprains and tears of soft tissues, like ligaments. In many cases, injuries involve more than one structure in the knee.

Pain and swelling are the most common signs of knee injury. In addition, your knee may catch or lock up. Many knee injuries cause instability — the feeling that your knee is giving way.

Fractures –
The most common bone broken around the knee is the patella. The ends of the femur and tibia where they meet to form the knee joint can also be fractured. Many fractures around the knee are caused by high energy trauma, such as falls from significant heights and motor vehicle collisions.

Dislocation –
A dislocation occurs when the bones of the knee are out of place, either completely or partially. For example, the femur and tibia can be forced out of alignment, and the patella can also slip out of place. Dislocations can be caused by an abnormality in the structure of a person’s knee. In people who have normal knee structure, dislocations are most often caused by high energy trauma, such as falls, motor vehicle crashes, and sports-related contact.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries –
The anterior cruciate ligament is often injured during sports activities. Athletes who participate in high demand sports like soccer, football, and basketball are more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligaments. Changing direction rapidly or landing from a jump incorrectly can tear the ACL. About half of all injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament occur along with damage to other structures in the knee, such as articular cartilage, meniscus, or other ligaments.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries –
The posterior cruciate ligament is often injured from a blow to the front of the knee while the knee is bent. This often occurs in motor vehicle crashes and sports-related contact. Posterior cruciate ligament tears tend to be partial tears with the potential to heal on their own.

Collateral Ligament Injuries –
Injuries to the collateral ligaments are usually caused by a force that pushes the knee sideways. These are often contact injuries. Injuries to the MCL are usually caused by a direct blow to the outside of the knee, and are often sports-related. Blows to the inside of the knee that push the knee outwards may injure the lateral collateral ligament. Lateral collateral ligament tears occur less frequently than other knee injuries.

Meniscal Tears –
Sudden meniscal tears often happen during sports. Tears in the meniscus can occur when twisting, cutting, pivoting, or being tackled. Meniscal tears may also occur as a result of arthritis or aging. Just an awkward twist when getting up from a chair may be enough to cause a tear, if the menisci have weakened with age.

Tendon Tears –
The quadriceps and patellar tendons can be stretched and torn. Although anyone can injure these tendons, tears are more common among middle-aged people who play running or jumping sports. Falls, direct force to the front of the knee, and landing awkwardly from a jump are common causes of knee tendon injuries.

Treatment of Knee Injuries –
When you are first injured, the RICE method — rest, ice, gentle compression and elevation – can help speed your recovery.

Be sure to seek treatment as soon as possible, especially if you:

Hear a popping noise and feel your knee give out at the time of injury
* Have severe pain
* Cannot move the knee
* Begin limping
* Have swelling at the injury site

The type of treatment your doctor recommends will depend on several factors, such as the severity of your injury, your age, general health, and activity level.

Nonsurgical Treatment –
Many knee injuries can be treated with simple measures, such as:

* Immobilization. Your doctor may recommend a brace to prevent your knee from moving. If you have fractured a bone, a cast or brace may hold the bones in place while they heal. To further protect your knee, you may be given crutches to keep you from putting weight on your leg.

* Physical therapy. Specific exercises will restore function to your knee and strengthen the leg muscles that support it.
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines. Drugs like aspirin and ibuprofen reduce pain and swelling.

Surgical Treatment –
Many fractures and injuries around the knee require surgery to fully restore function to your leg. In some cases – such as many ACL tears — surgery can be done arthroscopically using miniature instruments and small incisions. Many injuries require open surgery with a larger incision that provides your surgeon with a more direct view and easier access to the injured structures.

If you are experiencing knee pain and/or a knee injury, the dedicated orthopedic experts at TOCA are here to help! For more information visit our website at: www.tocamd.com or call our dedicated staff at 602-277-6211.

 

#Recovery #Results #Relief #kneepain #fixmedoc

 

 

 

New Biologic Therapies for Osteoarthritis of the Knee

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Our knowledge of the healing process in the human body is rapidly expanding. We have learned a great deal from studying the body’s response to injury at the chemical and cellular level. Much of this knowledge of tissue repair is now being used to develop new and exciting treatments for degenerative conditions such as arthritis…and, as always, the knee joint is getting most of the attention at the outset.

  • Hyaluronic Acid
  • Platelet Rich Plasma
  • Amniotic Tissue Preparations
  • Stem Cells

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A stem cell is a cell that has the ability to differentiate into different cell types. Bone marrow derived stem cells are mesenchymal stem cells that can differentiate into soft tissues including muscle, tendon and cartilage that are most relevant to orthopedic issues. Stem cells sit at the center of a growing field of medicine called regenerative medicine. Regenerative medicine aims to use the body’s own natural healing systems to repair damage, decrease pain and improve function.
Stem cell therapy is a minimally invasive, same-day, non-surgical procedure that is done in an office-based setting. TOCA is among a select group of orthopedic practices that have physicians fellowship-trained in regenerative procedures. Stem cells are harvested or withdrawn with the use of ultrasound guidance through a large needle from the back of the hip. Going to a surgical center or operating room is not necessary. IV sedation is not necessary. This treatment offers a promising alternative for those patients considering having an artificial joint implanted. Patients who have continued pain despite having exhausted more traditional non-surgical treatments such as physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medications and cortisone injections may benefit as well. Stem cell treatments are experimental and are not the current standard of care. However, similar to how interventional cardiology has substantially decreased the number of open heart bypass procedures, interventional orthopedics is a growing field that hopes to use less invasive treatments such as stem cells to stave off or decrease the number of joint replacements and, at the very least, improve pain and function.

During the procedure, stem cells taken from the back of the hip and are concentrated using a centrifuge machine. Together with a patient’s own platelet-rich plasma (PRP), these cells are injected under ultrasound guidance into areas of damage. Though the procedure is experimental, there is evidence that these procedures are safe and effective for a majority of patients. (link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24113698). We assess stem cell therapy’s effectiveness using pain relief and functional improvement as the criteria.

To read more about Stem Cell Therapy Click here. To Download TOCA’s PRP/Stem Cell Therapy Packet information and view patient education videos Click Here.

What Should I do If I Think I’m a Candidate?
Dr. Joseph Blazuk and Dr. Richard Emerson are dedicated to quality comprehensive patient care and to answer all of your PRP and Stem Cell Therapy and procedure questions.

To schedule a consultation call the TOCA Team at 602-277-6211 today!

Please bring whatever radiology films or studies (X-rays, MRIs) you have available.

ACL GRAFTS: Gerald Yacobucci, M.D.

ACL GRAFTS: Gerald Yacobucci, M.D.

Surgery for the torn Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) has a long history in the orthopedic sports medicine spotlight. We have gone through many phases in our understanding of the importance of the ACL in the active patient’s knee.

We learned early on that the torn ACL did not have the capacity to heal due to its poor blood supply and the hostile healing environment in the knee joint. Initially, we thought it was expendable and therefore could be left alone when torn. Those patients didn’t do well.

We then decided the torn ACL could be repaired…stitched together…most of them failed. Next we tried replacing it with artificial substitutes…gortex and carbon fiber grafts…those lasted a very short time before rupturing and were difficult to remove.

Finally, the biological graft (human tendon) was found to have all the necessary traits to replace the torn ACL and, if properly placed in the knee, could provide the function necessary to restore stability to the active patient’s knee.

Graft choices today involve either an autograft (the patient’s tendon, typically from the surgical leg) or an allograft (from a deceased human donor, cadaver tissue).

The most popular autograft is the Patellar Tendon (Middle One-third Bone-Tendon-Bone). This is the Gold Standard of grafts as it was the first to become popular and the only one to provide bone-to-bone healing at each end of the graft. One negative is patients often get patellar pain for a period of time after the surgery. The midline incision (scar) is sensitive to kneel on and the donor site weakens the patella (making a patella fracture very challenging to treat). This is the graft of choice for the large contact athlete (ie. football lineman) due to its predictable strength and stability characteristics.

Another good autograft is the Semitendinosis-Gracilis graft. Both are medial hamstrings which can be harvested through a small incision which is well away from the midline (better cosmesis and easy to kneel on). The hamstring muscles adapt very well and fill in the donor defect with strong collagen tissue…avoiding permanent muscle deficits. At one year follow-up, most studies show this graft achieves comparable strength to the Patellar Tendon Graft. This graft makes the most sense for an athlete under age 25 whose emphasis is on speed and agility (less patellar pain and patellar tendon pain).

Lastly, the Allograft…..tibialis anterior and middle third bone-patellar-bone being the most popular. These two are grouped together are far as strength and healing traits. Their main advantage is eliminating the pain, scarring and weakness that goes with autografts….making the recovery from ACL surgery easier. Two concerns arise with these grafts. Disease transmission is a theoretical concern and has been thoroughly addressed by the human tissue bank industry. Meticulous detail goes into the harvesting, testing and preservation of this tissue which currently is felt to carry with it a risk for disease transmission of less than one in one million. The second issue (borne out in several recent studies) is one of graft rupture (failure). This has been shown in several studies to be significantly higher in male patients under the age of 25.

I hope this brief overview of a very complex topic improves understanding for the patient and serves as a starting point for discussion between the patient and their surgeon regarding ACL graft choice.

If you are experiencing knee pain call one of our experts at TOCA by calling 602-277-6211 or visiting our website to learn more atwww.tocamd.com!

#Recovery #Results #Relief #DrYaco